Sight vs Insult - What's the difference?

sight | insult |


In obsolete|lang=en terms the difference between sight and insult

is that sight is (obsolete) the instrument of seeing; the eye while insult is (obsolete) the act of leaping on; onset; attack.

In lang=en terms the difference between sight and insult

is that sight is to take aim at while insult is to offend (someone) by being rude, insensitive or insolent; to demean or affront (someone).

As nouns the difference between sight and insult

is that sight is (in the singular) the ability to see while insult is an action or form of speech deliberately intended to be rude.

As verbs the difference between sight and insult

is that sight is to register visually while insult is (obsolete|intransitive) to behave in an obnoxious and superior manner (over, against).

sight

English

Noun

  • (in the singular) The ability to see.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Thy sight is young, / And thou shalt read when mine begin to dazzle.
  • * Milton
  • O loss of sight , of thee I most complain!
  • The act of seeing; perception of objects by the eye; view.
  • to gain sight of land
  • * Bible, Acts i. 9
  • A cloud received him out of their sight .
  • Something seen.
  • * 2005 , Lesley Brown (translator), :
  • * He's a really remarkable man and it's very hard to get him in one's sights ;
  • Something worth seeing; a spectacle.
  • You really look a sight in that silly costume!
  • * Bible, Exodus iii. 3
  • Moses said, I will now turn aside and see this great sight , why the bush is not burnt.
  • * Spenser
  • They never saw a sight so fair.
  • A device used in aiming a projectile, through which the person aiming looks at the intended target.
  • A small aperture through which objects are to be seen, and by which their direction is settled or ascertained.
  • the sight of a quadrant
  • * Shakespeare
  • their eyes of fire sparking through sights of steel
  • a great deal, a lot; (frequently used to intensify a comparative).
  • a sight of money
    This is a darn sight better than what I'm used to at home!
  • * Gower
  • a wonder sight of flowers
  • * 1913 ,
  • "If your mother put you in the pit at twelve, it's no reason why I should do the same with my lad."
    "Twelve! It wor a sight afore that!"
  • In a drawing, picture, etc., that part of the surface, as of paper or canvas, which is within the frame or the border or margin. In a frame, the open space, the opening.
  • (obsolete) The instrument of seeing; the eye.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Why cloud they not their sights ?
  • Mental view; opinion; judgment.
  • In their sight it was harmless.
    (Wake)
  • * Bible, Luke xvi. 15
  • That which is highly esteemed among men is abomination in the sight of God.

    Synonyms

    * (ability to see) sense of sight, vision * (something seen) view * (aiming device) scope, peep sight

    Derived terms

    * sight for sore eyes * far-sighted * in sight * insight * long-sighted * near-sighted * not a pretty sight * at sight * on sight * out of sight * * outsight * second sight * short-sighted * sight cheque * sight draft * sight for sore eyes * sight gag * sight rhyme * sight unseen

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To register visually.
  • To get sight of (something).
  • * , chapter=4
  • , title= Mr. Pratt's Patients , passage=I was on my way to the door, but all at once, through the fog in my head, I began to sight one reef that I hadn't paid any attention to afore.}}
  • To apply sights to; to adjust the sights of; also, to give the proper elevation and direction to by means of a sight.
  • To take aim at.
  • Synonyms

    * (visually register) see * (get sight of) espy, glimpse, spot * (take aim) aim at, take aim at

    Derived terms

    * resight

    See also

    * see * vision

    Statistics

    *

    Anagrams

    *

    insult

    English

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (obsolete) To behave in an obnoxious and superior manner (over, against).
  • *, II.3.3:
  • thou hast lost all, poor thou art, dejected, in pain of body, grief of mind, thine enemies insult over thee, thou art as bad as Job […].
  • To offend (someone) by being rude, insensitive or insolent; to demean or affront (someone).
  • (obsolete) To leap or trample upon; to make a sudden onset upon.
  • (Shakespeare)

    Synonyms

    * (to offend) abuse, affront, offend, slight * See also

    Antonyms

    *compliment

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • An action or form of speech deliberately intended to be rude.
  • * Savage
  • the ruthless sneer that insult adds to grief
  • * 1987 , Jamie Lee Curtis, A Fish Called Wanda :
  • To call you stupid would be an insult to stupid people!
  • Anything that causes offence/offense, e.g. by being of an unacceptable quality.
  • The way the orchestra performed tonight was an insult to my ears.
  • (medicine) Something causing disease or injury to the body or bodily processes.
  • * 2006 , Stephen G. Lomber, Jos J. Eggermont, Reprogramming the Cerebral Cortex (page 415)
  • * 2011 , Terence Allen and Graham Cowling, The Cell: A Very Short Introduction , Oxford 2011, p. 96:
  • Within the complex genome of most organisms there are alternative multiple pathways of proteins which can help the individual cell survive a variety of insults , for example radiation, toxic chemicals, heat, excessive or reduced oxygen.
  • (obsolete) The act of leaping on; onset; attack.
  • (Dryden)

    Synonyms

    * (deliberatedly intended to be rude) abuse (uncountable), affront, offence (UK)/offense (US), pejorative, slam, slight, slur * (thing causing offence by being of unacceptable quality) disgrace, outrage * See also

    Antonyms

    *compliment

    Anagrams

    * * English heteronyms