Grain vs Instinct - What's the difference?

grain | instinct |


As nouns the difference between grain and instinct

is that grain is hate, hatred, disgust while instinct is a natural or inherent impulse or behaviour.

As an adjective instinct is

(archaic) imbued, charged ((with) something).

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

grain

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl) grain, grein, from (etyl) . Compare English corn.

Noun

  • (uncountable) The harvested seeds of various grass food crops eg: wheat, corn, barley.
  • We stored a thousand tons of grain for the winter.
  • (uncountable) Similar seeds from any food crop, eg buckwheat, amaranth, quinoa.
  • (countable) A single seed of grain.
  • a grain of wheat
  • (countable, uncountable) The crops from which grain is harvested.
  • The fields were planted with grain .
  • (uncountable) A linear texture of a material or surface.
  • Cut along the grain of the wood.
  • (countable) A single particle of a substance.
  • a grain of sand
    a grain of salt
  • (countable) A very small unit of weight, in England equal to 1/480 of an ounce troy, 0.0648 grams or, to be more exact, 64.79891 milligrams (0.002285714 avoirdupois ounce). A carat grain or pearl grain is 1/4 carat or 50 milligrams. The old French grain was 1/9216 livre or 53.11 milligrams, and in the mesures usuelles permitted from 1812 to 1839, with the livre redefined as 500 grams, it was 54.25 milligrams.
  • (countable) A former unit of gold purity, also known as carat grain , equal to "carat" (karat).
  • (materials) A region within a material having a single crystal structure or direction.
  • A reddish dye made from the coccus insect, or kermes; hence, a red color of any tint or hue, as crimson, scarlet, etc.; sometimes used by the poets as equivalent to Tyrian purple.
  • * Milton
  • all in a robe of darkest grain
  • * Quoted by Coleridge, preface to Aids to Reflection
  • doing as the dyers do, who, having first dipped their silks in colours of less value, then give them the last tincture of crimson in grain .
  • The hair side of a piece of leather, or the marking on that side.
  • (Knight)
  • (in the plural) The remains of grain, etc., after brewing or distillation; hence, any residuum. Also called
  • (botany) A rounded prominence on the back of a sepal, as in the common dock.
  • Temper; natural disposition; inclination.
  • * Hayward
  • brothers not united in grain
    Derived terms
    * against the grain * grain of salt
    See also
    * cereal

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To feed grain to.
  • To make granular; to form into grains.
  • To form grains, or to assume a granular form, as the result of crystallization; to granulate.
  • To texture a surface in imitation of the grain of a substance such as wood.
  • (tanning) To remove the hair or fat from a skin.
  • (tanning) To soften leather.
  • To yield fruit.
  • (Gower)

    Etymology 2

    See .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A branch of a tree; a stalk or stem of a plant.
  • A tine, prong, or fork.
  • # One of the branches of a valley or river.
  • # An iron fish spear or harpoon, with a number of points half-barbed inwardly.
  • #* 1770 : Served 5 lb of fish per man which was caught by striking with grains'' — journal of Stephen Forwood (gunner on ), 4 May 1770, quoted by Parkin (page 195).
  • # A blade of a sword, knife, etc.
  • (founding) A thin piece of metal, used in a mould to steady a core.
  • Anagrams

    * ----

    instinct

    Noun

  • A natural or inherent impulse or behaviour.
  • Many animals fear fire by instinct .
  • * Shakespeare
  • By a divine instinct , men's minds mistrust / Ensuing dangers.
  • * {{quote-book
  • , year=1921 , title= , author=Bertrand Russell , passage=In spite of these qualifications, the broad distinction between instinct and habit is undeniable. To take extreme cases, every animal at birth can take food by instinct, before it has had opportunity to learn; on the other hand, no one can ride a bicycle by instinct, though, after learning, the necessary movements become just as automatic as if they were instinctive.}}
  • An intuitive reaction not based on rational conscious thought.
  • an instinct''' for order; to be modest by '''instinct
    Debbie's instinct was to distrust John.

    Derived terms

    * instinctively * instinctive

    Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • (archaic) Imbued, charged ((with) something).
  • * Milton
  • The chariot of paternal deity / Itself instinct with spirit, but convoyed / By four cherubic shapes.
  • * Brougham
  • a noble performance, instinct with sound principle
  • * 1928 , (HP Lovecraft), ‘The Call of Cthulhu’:
  • This thing, which seemed instinct with a fearsome and unnatural malignancy, was of a somewhat bloated corpulence, and squatted evilly on a rectangular block or pedestal covered with undecipherable characters.