Jibe vs Insinuate - What's the difference?

jibe | insinuate |


As verbs the difference between jibe and insinuate

is that jibe is (nautical) to perform a jibe or jibe can be to agree while insinuate is (rare) to creep, wind, or flow into; to enter gently, slowly, or imperceptibly, as into crevices.

As a noun jibe

is (nautical) a manoeuver in which the stern of a sailing boat or ship crosses the wind, typically resulting in the sudden sweep of the boom from one side of the sailboat to the other or jibe can be a facetious or insulting remark, a jeer or taunt.

jibe

English

(wikipedia jibe)

Etymology 1

From obsolete Dutch gijben, itself of obscure origin.

Alternative forms

* gybe

Noun

(en noun)
  • (nautical) A manoeuver in which the stern of a sailing boat or ship crosses the wind, typically resulting in the sudden sweep of the boom from one side of the sailboat to the other.
  • Derived terms
    * jibe ho

    Verb

    (jib)
  • (nautical) To perform a jibe
  • (nautical) To cause to execute a jibe
  • Etymology 2

    Origin unknown.

    Verb

    (jib)
  • To agree.
  • That explanation doesn't jibe with the facts.

    Usage notes

    "Jibe" and "jive" have been used interchangeably in the U.S. to indicate the concept "to agree or accord." While one recent dictionary accepts this usage of "jive," most sources consider it to be in error.

    Etymology 3

    Probably from Old French giber, to handle roughly.

    Alternative forms

    * gibe

    Noun

  • A facetious or insulting remark, a jeer or taunt.
  • He flung subtle jibes at her until she couldn't bear to work with him any longer.

    insinuate

    English

    Verb

  • (rare) To creep, wind, or flow into; to enter gently, slowly, or imperceptibly, as into crevices.
  • * Woodward
  • The water easily insinuates itself into, and placidly distends, the vessels of vegetables.
  • (figurative, by extension) To ingratiate; to obtain access to or introduce something by subtle, cunning or artful means.
  • * 1995 , , p. 242
  • Nanny didn't so much enter places as insinuate herself; she had unconsciously taken a natural talent for liking people and developed it into an occult science.
  • * John Locke
  • All the art of rhetoric, besides order and clearness, are for nothing else but to insinuate wrong ideas, move the passions, and thereby mislead the judgment.
  • * Dryden
  • Horace laughs to shame all follies and insinuates virtue, rather by familiar examples than by the severity of precepts.
  • * Clarendon
  • He insinuated himself into the very good grace of the Duke of Buckingham.
  • To hint; to suggest tacitly while avoiding a direct statement.
  • She insinuated that her friends had betrayed her.

    Synonyms

    * (Make a way for or introduce something by subtle, crafty or artful means. ): imply

    Anagrams

    * ----