Innuendo vs Insinuate - What's the difference?

innuendo | insinuate |


As a noun innuendo

is a derogatory hint or reference to a person or thing an implication or insinuation.

As a verb insinuate is

(rare) to creep, wind, or flow into; to enter gently, slowly, or imperceptibly, as into crevices.

innuendo

Alternative forms

* (archaic) inuendo

Noun

  • A derogatory hint or reference to a person or thing. An implication or insinuation.
  • She made a devious innuendo about her husband, who was embarrassed.
  • (logic) A rhetorical device with an omitted, but obvious conclusion, made to increase the force of an argument.
  • insinuate

    English

    Verb

  • (rare) To creep, wind, or flow into; to enter gently, slowly, or imperceptibly, as into crevices.
  • * Woodward
  • The water easily insinuates itself into, and placidly distends, the vessels of vegetables.
  • (figurative, by extension) To ingratiate; to obtain access to or introduce something by subtle, cunning or artful means.
  • * 1995 , , p. 242
  • Nanny didn't so much enter places as insinuate herself; she had unconsciously taken a natural talent for liking people and developed it into an occult science.
  • * John Locke
  • All the art of rhetoric, besides order and clearness, are for nothing else but to insinuate wrong ideas, move the passions, and thereby mislead the judgment.
  • * Dryden
  • Horace laughs to shame all follies and insinuates virtue, rather by familiar examples than by the severity of precepts.
  • * Clarendon
  • He insinuated himself into the very good grace of the Duke of Buckingham.
  • To hint; to suggest tacitly while avoiding a direct statement.
  • She insinuated that her friends had betrayed her.

    Synonyms

    * (Make a way for or introduce something by subtle, crafty or artful means. ): imply

    Anagrams

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