Adept vs Initiate - What's the difference?

adept | initiate |


As adjectives the difference between adept and initiate

is that adept is well skilled; completely versed; thoroughly proficient while initiate is (obsolete) unpractised; untried; new.

As nouns the difference between adept and initiate

is that adept is one fully skilled or well versed in anything; a proficient; as, adepts in philosophy while initiate is a new member of an organization.

As a verb initiate is

to begin; to start.

adept

English

Adjective

(en-adj)
  • Well skilled; completely versed; thoroughly proficient
  • * 1837-1839 ,
  • Adept as she was, in all the arts of cunning and dissimulation, the girl Nancy could not wholly conceal the effect which the knowledge of the step she had taken, wrought upon her mind.

    Synonyms

    * See also

    Antonyms

    * inept

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • One fully skilled or well versed in anything; a proficient; as, adepts in philosophy.
  • * 1841 , , Barnaby Rudge :
  • When he had achieved this task, he applied himself to the acquisition of stable language, in which he soon became such an adept , that he would perch outside my window and drive imaginary horses with great skill, all day.
  • * 1894-95 , , Jude the Obscure :
  • Others, alas, had an instinct towards artificiality in their very blood, and became adepts in counterfeiting at the first glimpse of it.

    Synonyms

    * See also

    Anagrams

    * pated, taped

    References

    * ----

    initiate

    English

    Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • (obsolete) Unpractised; untried; new.
  • * Shakespeare
  • the initiate fear that wants hard use
  • (obsolete) Begun; commenced; introduced to, or instructed in, the rudiments; newly admitted.
  • * Young
  • To rise in science as in bliss, / Initiate in the secrets of the skies.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A new member of an organization.
  • One who has been through a ceremony of initiation.
  • Verb

    (initiat)
  • To begin; to start.
  • * I. Taylor
  • How are changes of this sort to be initiated ?
  • To instruct in the rudiments or principles; to introduce.
  • * Dr. H. More
  • Providence would only initiate mankind into the useful knowledge of her treasures, leaving the rest to employ our industry.
  • * John Locke
  • To initiate his pupil into any part of learning, an ordinary skill in the governor is enough.
  • To confer membership on; especially, to admit to a secret order with mysterious rites or ceremonies.
  • * Bishop Warburton
  • The Athenians believed that he who was initiated and instructed in the mysteries would obtain celestial honour after death.
  • * Spectator
  • He was initiated into half a dozen clubs before he was one and twenty.
  • To do the first act; to perform the first rite; to take the initiative.
  • (Alexander Pope)

    Antonyms

    * (to begin) end, conclude, complete, finish