Plant vs Industry - What's the difference?

plant | industry |


As nouns the difference between plant and industry

is that plant is an organism that is not an animal, especially an organism capable of photosynthesis typically a small or herbaceous organism of this kind, rather than a tree while industry is (uncountable) the tendency to work persistently.

As a verb plant

is to place (a seed or plant) in soil or other substrate in order that it may live and grow.

plant

English

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Noun

(s)
  • An organism that is not an animal, especially an organism capable of photosynthesis. Typically a small or herbaceous organism of this kind, rather than a tree.
  • * {{quote-magazine, year=2013, month=May-June, author= Katrina G. Claw
  • , title= Rapid Evolution in Eggs and Sperm , volume=101, issue=3, page=217, magazine=(American Scientist) , passage=In plants , the ability to recognize self from nonself plays an important role in fertilization, because self-fertilization will result in less diverse offspring than fertilization with pollen from another individual. Many genes with reproductive roles also have antibacterial and immune functions, which indicate that the threat of microbial attack on the sperm or egg may be a major influence on rapid evolution during reproduction.}}
  • (botany) An organism of the kingdom Plantae''; now specifically, a living organism of the ''Embryophyta'' (land plants) or of the ''Chlorophyta'' (green algae), a eukaryote that includes double-membraned chloroplasts in its cells containing chlorophyll ''a'' and ''b , or any organism closely related to such an organism.
  • (ecology) Now specifically, a multicellular eukaryote that includes chloroplasts in its cells, which have a cell wall.
  • Any creature that grows on soil or similar surfaces, including plants and fungi.
  • A factory or other industrial or institutional building or facility.
  • An object placed surreptitiously in order to cause suspicion to fall upon a person.
  • Anyone assigned to behave as a member of the public during a covert operation (as in a police investigation).
  • A person, placed amongst an audience, whose role is to cause confusion, laughter etc.
  • (snooker) A play in which the cue ball knocks one (usually red) ball onto another, in order to pot the second; a set.
  • * 2008 , Phil Yates, The Times , April 28 2008:
  • O‚ÄôSullivan risked a plant that went badly astray, splitting the reds.
  • A large piece of machinery, such as the kind used in earthmoving or construction.
  • (obsolete) A young tree; a sapling; hence, a stick or staff.
  • * Dryden
  • a plant of stubborn oak
  • (obsolete) The sole of the foot.
  • * Ben Jonson
  • * knotty legs and plants of clay
  • (dated, slang) A plan; a swindle; a trick.
  • * Charles Dickens
  • It wasn't a bad plant , that of mine, on Fikey.
  • An oyster which has been bedded, in distinction from one of natural growth.
  • (US, dialect) A young oyster suitable for transplanting.
  • Usage notes

    The scientific definition of what organisms should be considered plants changed dramatically during the 20th century. Bacteria, algae, and fungi are no longer considered plants by those who study them. Many textbooks do not reflect the most current thinking on classification.

    Derived terms

    * houseplant * planter * plantlet * plantly * plant-pot * pot-plant * power plant * plant room

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To place (a seed or plant) in soil or other substrate in order that it may live and grow.
  • To place (an object, or sometimes a person), often with the implication of intending deceit.
  • That gun's not mine! It was planted there by the real murderer!
  • To place or set something firmly or with conviction.
  • Plant your feet firmly and give the rope a good tug.
    to plant''' cannon against a fort; to '''plant''' a flag; to '''plant one's feet on solid ground
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=2011 , date=January 15 , author=Sam Sheringham , title=Chelsea 2 - 0 Blackburn Rovers , work=BBC citation , page= , passage=First Anelka curled a shot wide from just outside the box, then Lampard planted a header over the bar from Bosingwa's cross.}}
  • To place in the ground.
  • * 2007 , Richard Laymon, Savage , page 118:
  • Sarah, she kissed each of her grandparents on the forehead. They were planted in a graveyard behind the church.
  • To furnish or supply with plants.
  • to plant a garden, an orchard, or a forest
  • To engender; to generate; to set the germ of.
  • * Shakespeare
  • It engenders choler, planteth anger.
  • To furnish with a fixed and organized population; to settle; to establish.
  • to plant a colony
  • * Francis Bacon
  • planting of countries like planting of woods
  • To introduce and establish the principles or seeds of.
  • to plant Christianity among the heathen
  • To set up; to install; to instate.
  • * Shakespeare
  • We will plant some other in the throne.

    Derived terms

    * faceplant, handplant * plant out

    See also

    * (wikipedia) 1000 English basic words ----

    industry

    Noun

  • (uncountable) The tendency to work persistently.
  • * {{quote-news, year=2011, date=November 12, work=BBC Sport
  • , title= International friendly: England 1-0 Spain , passage=England's win was built on industry and discipline, epitomised by the performances of Manchester City's Joleon Lescott in defence and Scott Parker in midfield.}}
  • (countable, business, economics) Businesses of the same type, considered as a whole.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-06-01, volume=407, issue=8838, page=71, magazine=(The Economist)
  • , title= End of the peer show , passage=Finance is seldom romantic. But the idea of peer-to-peer lending comes close. This is an industry that brings together individual savers and lenders on online platforms. Those that want to borrow are matched with those that want to lend.}}
  • (uncountable, economics) Businesses that produce goods as opposed to services.
  • * {{quote-book, year=2006, author=(Edwin Black)
  • , title= Internal Combustion, chapter=2 , passage=But through the oligopoly, charcoal fuel proliferated throughout London's trades and industries .  By the 1200s, brewers and bakers, tilemakers, glassblowers, pottery producers, and a range of other craftsmen all became hour-to-hour consumers of charcoal.}}
  • (in the singular, economics) The sector of the economy consisting of large-scale enterprises.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-07-20, volume=408, issue=8845, magazine=(The Economist)
  • , title= Out of the gloom , passage=[Rural solar plant] schemes are of little help to industry or other heavy users of electricity. Nor is solar power yet as cheap as the grid. For all that, the rapid arrival of electric light to Indian villages is long overdue. When the national grid suffers its next huge outage, as it did in July 2012 when hundreds of millions were left in the dark, look for specks of light in the villages.}}
  • Automated production of material goods{{cite web
  • , author=(European Parliament) , title= Europarl 2003-09-24: Amended Software Patent Directive , date=2003-09-24 }}.
  • *
  • Synonyms

    * (tendency to work persistently) diligence; application * (businesses of the same type) sector; field * (businesses that produce goods) manufacturing

    Derived terms

    * automotive industry * captain of industry * cottage industry * film industry * finance industry * food services industry * health care industry * heavy industry * light industry * primary industry * secondary industry * smokestack industry * software industry * tertiary industry * video game industry

    References