Convict vs Indict - What's the difference?

convict | indict |


In context|legal|lang=en terms the difference between convict and indict

is that convict is (legal) a person convicted of a crime by a judicial body while indict is (legal) to make a formal accusation or indictment for a crime against (a party) by the findings of a jury, especially a grand jury.

As verbs the difference between convict and indict

is that convict is to find guilty while indict is to accuse of wrongdoing; charge.

As a noun convict

is (legal) a person convicted of a crime by a judicial body.

convict

English

Verb

(en verb)
  • To find guilty
  • # as a result of legal proceedings, about of a crime
  • # informally, notably in a moral sense; said about both perpetrator and act.
  • Synonyms

    * (legal crime) sentence * (informal) disapprove

    Noun

    (wikipedia convict) (en noun)
  • (legal) A person convicted of a crime by a judicial body.
  • A person deported to a penal colony.
  • A common name for the sheepshead (Archosargus probatocephalus), owing to its black and stripes.
  • Synonyms

    * (person convicted of crime) assigned servant, con, government man, public servant * (person deported to a penal colony) penal colonist

    Derived terms

    * con (synonym)

    indict

    English

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To accuse of wrongdoing; charge.
  • a book that indicts modern values
  • (legal) To make a formal accusation or indictment for a crime against (a party) by the findings of a jury, especially a grand jury.
  • his former manager was indicted for fraud

    See also

    * indite