Insinuate vs Impugn - What's the difference?

insinuate | impugn |


As verbs the difference between insinuate and impugn

is that insinuate is (rare) to creep, wind, or flow into; to enter gently, slowly, or imperceptibly, as into crevices while impugn is (obsolete) to assault, attack.

insinuate

English

Verb

  • (rare) To creep, wind, or flow into; to enter gently, slowly, or imperceptibly, as into crevices.
  • * Woodward
  • The water easily insinuates itself into, and placidly distends, the vessels of vegetables.
  • (figurative, by extension) To ingratiate; to obtain access to or introduce something by subtle, cunning or artful means.
  • * 1995 , , p. 242
  • Nanny didn't so much enter places as insinuate herself; she had unconsciously taken a natural talent for liking people and developed it into an occult science.
  • * John Locke
  • All the art of rhetoric, besides order and clearness, are for nothing else but to insinuate wrong ideas, move the passions, and thereby mislead the judgment.
  • * Dryden
  • Horace laughs to shame all follies and insinuates virtue, rather by familiar examples than by the severity of precepts.
  • * Clarendon
  • He insinuated himself into the very good grace of the Duke of Buckingham.
  • To hint; to suggest tacitly while avoiding a direct statement.
  • She insinuated that her friends had betrayed her.

    Synonyms

    * (Make a way for or introduce something by subtle, crafty or artful means. ): imply

    Anagrams

    * ----

    impugn

    English

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (obsolete) To assault, attack.
  • To verbally assault, especially to argue against an opinion, motive, or action; to question the truth or validity of.
  • Quotations

    {{timeline, 1800s=1859 1864 1872 1889, 1900s=1922}} * 1859 — *: Let the opinions impugned be the belief in a God and in a future state, or any of the commonly received doctrines of morality. * 1864 — *: There have been much impugning of motives and much heated controversy as to the proper means and best mode of advancing the Union cause. * 1872 — *: At home, at a period of immense prosperity, with a people contented and naturally loyal, we find to our surprise the most extravagant doctrines professed and the fundamental principles of our most valuable institutions impugned , and that too by persons of some authority. * 1889 — , ch. xxv *: It is a hardy question, fair sir and Boss, since it doth go far to impugn the wisdom of even our holy Mother Church herself. * 1922 — , ch. 21 *: He is not dead. When he revives he will return to his quarters with a fine tale of his bravery and there will be none to impugn his boasts.

    Synonyms

    * (to question the validity of) call into question, challenge, contest, contradict, deny, disavow, dispute, oppugn, negate

    Antonyms

    * (to question the validity of) authenticate, endorse, support

    Derived terms

    * impugnable * impugner

    Anagrams

    *