Oblige vs Impose - What's the difference?

oblige | impose |


As verbs the difference between oblige and impose

is that oblige is while impose is .

oblige

English

Verb

(oblig)
  • To constrain someone by force or by social, moral or legal means.
  • I am obliged to report to the police station every week.
    {{quote-Fanny Hill, part=3 , Tho' he was some time awake before me, yet did he not offer to disturb a repose he had given me so much occasion for; but on my first stirring, which was not till past ten o'clock, I was oblig'd to endure one more trial of his manhood.}}
  • To do someone a service or favour (hence, originally, creating an obligation).
  • He obliged me by not parking his car in the drive.
  • *
  • To be indebted to someone.
  • I am obliged to you for your recent help.
  • To do a service or favour.
  • The singer obliged with another song.

    Derived terms

    * disoblige

    Usage notes

    "Obliged" has largely replaced "obligate"; the latter being more common in the the 17th through 19th centuries.The New Fowler’s Modern English Usage (1996)

    Anagrams

    *

    impose

    English

    Verb

    (impos)
  • To establish or apply by authority.
  • * Milton
  • Death is the penalty imposed .
    Congress imposed new tariffs.
  • * 2012 October 31, David M. Halbfinger, "[http://www.nytimes.com/2012/11/01/nyregion/new-jersey-continues-to-cope-with-hurricane-sandy.html?hp]," New York Times (retrieved 31 October 2012):
  • Localities across New Jersey imposed curfews to prevent looting. In Monmouth, Ocean and other counties, people waited for hours for gasoline at the few stations that had electricity. Supermarket shelves were stripped bare.
  • to be an inconvenience
  • I don't wish to impose upon you.
  • to enforce: compel to behave in a certain way
  • Social relations impose courtesy
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=2011 , date=December 10 , author=Arindam Rej , title=Norwich 4 - 2 Newcastle , work=BBC Sport citation , page= , passage=Norwich soon began imposing themselves on that patched-up defence with Holt having their best early chance, only to see it blocked by Simpson.}}
  • To practice a trick or deception.
  • To lay on, as the hands, in the religious rites of confirmation and ordination.
  • To arrange in proper order on a table of stone or metal and lock up in a chase for printing; said of columns or pages of type, forms, etc.
  • Derived terms

    * imposition * superimpose * imposure