Solicit vs Importune - What's the difference?

solicit | importune |


As verbs the difference between solicit and importune

is that solicit is to persistently endeavor to obtain an object, or bring about an event while importune is .

solicit

English

Verb

(en verb)
  • To persistently endeavor to obtain an object, or bring about an event.
  • to solicit alms, or a favour
  • * Alexander Pope
  • I view my crime, but kindle at the view, / Repent old pleasures, and solicit new.
    Did I solicit thee From darkness to promote me?
  • To woo; to court.
  • To persuade or incite one to commit some act, especially illegal or sexual behavior.
  • * Milton
  • That fruit solicited her longing eye.
  • * Locke
  • Sounds and some tangible qualities solicit their proper senses, and force an entrance to the mind.
    If you want to lose your virginity, you should try to solicit some fine looking women.
  • To offer to perform sexual activity, especially when for a payment.
  • My girlfriend tried to solicit me for sex, but I was tired.
  • To make a petition.
  • (archaic) To disturb or trouble; to harass.
  • To urge the claims of; to plead; to act as solicitor for or with reference to.
  • * Ford
  • Should / My brother henceforth study to forget / The vow that he hath made thee, I would ever / Solicit thy deserts.
  • (obsolete, rare) To disturb; to disquiet.
  • * Chapman
  • Hath any ill solicited thine ears?
  • * Dryden
  • But anxious fears solicit my weak breast.

    Synonyms

    * request * plead * appeal * thig * supplicate

    Anagrams

    *

    importune

    English

    Verb

    (importun)
  • To bother, trouble, irritate.
  • * , II.17:
  • To deliberate, be it but in slight matters, doth importune me.
  • To harass with persistent requests.
  • * 1610 , , act 2 scene 1
  • You were kneel'd to, and importun'd otherwise / By all of us;.
  • * Jonathan Swift
  • Their ministers and residents here have perpetually importuned the court with unreasonable demands.
  • To approach to offer one's services as a prostitute, or otherwise make improper proposals.
  • (obsolete) To import; to signify.
  • * Spenser
  • It importunes death.

    Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • (obsolete) Grievous, severe, exacting.
  • * 1590 , Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene , II.vi:
  • And therewithall he fiercely at him flew, / And with importune outrage him assayld [...].
  • (obsolete) inopportune; unseasonable
  • (obsolete) troublesome; vexatious; persistent
  • * Spenser
  • And their importune fates all satisfied.
  • * Francis Bacon
  • Of all other affections it [envy] is the most importune and continual.