Tissue vs Hydrops - What's the difference?

tissue | hydrops |


As nouns the difference between tissue and hydrops

is that tissue is thin, woven, gauze-like fabric while hydrops is (medicine) the abnormal accumulation of serous fluid in a tissue or cavity.

As a verb tissue

is to form tissue of; to interweave.

tissue

English

Noun

(en noun)
  • Thin, woven, gauze-like fabric.
  • * {{quote-book, year=1963, author=(Margery Allingham), title=(The China Governess)
  • , chapter=17 citation , passage=The face which emerged was not reassuring. It was blunt and grey, the nose springing thick and flat from high on the frontal bone of the forehead, whilst his eyes were narrow slits of dark in a tight bandage of tissue . […].}}
  • A fine transparent silk material, used for veils, etc.; specifically, cloth interwoven with gold or silver threads, or embossed with figures.
  • * Dryden
  • a robe of tissue , stiff with golden wire
  • * Milton
  • In their glittering tissues bear emblazed / Holy memorials.
  • A sheet of absorbent paper, especially one that is made to be used as tissue paper, toilet paper or a handkerchief.
  • Absorbent paper as material.
  • (biology) A group of similar cells that function together to do a specific job
  • * 1924 , ARISTOTLE. Metaphysics . Translated by W. D. Ross. Nashotah, Wisconsin, USA: The Classical Library, 2001. Available at: . Book 1, Part 10.
  • But it is similarly necessary that flesh and each of the other tissues should be the ratio of its elements, or that not one of them should;
  • Web; texture; complicated fabrication; connected series.
  • a tissue of forgeries, or of lies
  • * A. J. Balfour
  • unwilling to leave the dry bones of Agnosticism wholly unclothed with any living tissue of religious emotion

    Verb

    (tissu)
  • To form tissue of; to interweave.
  • Covered with cloth of gold tissued upon blue. — Francis Bacon.

    Anagrams

    *

    hydrops

    English

    Noun

    (-)
  • (medicine) The abnormal accumulation of serous fluid in a tissue or cavity
  • See also

    * dropsy * edema