Husk vs Husklike - What's the difference?

husk | husklike |


As a noun husk

is the dry, leafy or stringy exterior of certain vegetables or fruits, which must be removed before eating the meat inside.

As a verb husk

is to remove husks from or husk can be to say huskily, to utter in a husky voice.

As an adjective husklike is

resembling a husk or some aspect of one.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

husk

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl) . More at (l), (l). Alternate etymology derives husk from Low German .)

Noun

(wikipedia husk) (en noun)
  • The dry, leafy or stringy exterior of certain vegetables or fruits, which must be removed before eating the meat inside
  • A coconut has a very thick husk .
  • Any form of useless, dried-up, and subsequently worthless exterior of something
  • His attorney was a dried-up husk of a man.
  • The supporting frame of a run of millstones.
  • Verb

    (en verb)
  • To remove husks from.
  • Etymology 2

    Partly imitative, partly from Etymology 1, above, influenced by (husky).

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To say huskily, to utter in a husky voice.
  • * The French captain did not immediately respond; he looked at his men with a miserable expression [...]; still he hesitated, drooped, and finally husked , "Je me rends," with a look still more wretched. — (Naomi Novik), "His Majesty's Dragon"
  • See also

    * husky

    References

    The Australian Pocket Oxford Dictionary , 2nd Ed., Melbourne, Oxford University Press, 1978 ----

    husklike

    English

    Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • Resembling a husk or some aspect of one.