Frog vs Human - What's the difference?

frog | human |


As a noun frog

is a small tailless amphibian of the order anura that typically hops or frog can be (offensive) a french person or frog can be a leather or fabric loop used to attach a sword or bayonet, or its scabbard, to a waist or shoulder belt.

As a verb frog

is to hunt or trap frogs or frog can be to ornament or fasten a coat, etc with frogs or frog can be to unravel (a knitted garment).

As an adjective human is

(label) classical (of or pertaining to the classical - latin, greek - languages, literature, history and philosophy).

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

frog

English

(wikipedia frog) (commons)

Etymology 1

From (etyl) (m), from (etyl) (m), ).J.P. Mallory & D.Q. Adams, eds, Encyclopedia of Indo-European Culture , s.v. "Jump" (London: Fitzroy Dearborn, 1997), 323. See also (l), (l).

Noun

(en noun)
  • A small tailless amphibian of the order Anura that typically hops
  • The part of a violin bow (or that of other similar string instruments such as the viola, cello and contrabass) located at the end held by the player, to which the horsehair is attached
  • (Cockney rhyming slang) Road. Shorter, more common form of frog and toad
  • The depression in the upper face of a pressed or handmade clay brick
  • An organ on the bottom of a horse’s hoof that assists in the circulation of blood
  • The part of a railway switch or turnout where the running-rails cross (from the resemblance to the frog in a horse’s hoof)
  • An oblong cloak button, covered with netted thread, and fastening into a loop instead of a button hole.
  • The loop of the scabbard of a bayonet or sword.
  • Synonyms
    * frosh, frosk, frock * pad, paddock * (railway switch component) common crossing
    Derived terms
    (Derived terms) * * * bush frog * clawed frog * common frog * Darwin's frog * disc-tongued frog * edible frog * * * fine as frog hair, finer than frog hair * Frog (metathesis: > Gorf) * frog belly * frogbit * frog chorus * frogeater, frog eater * frogeye * frogeyed * frog face * frogfish * frogged * froggery * frogging * froggish * froggy * Froggy * froghopper * a frog in one’s throat * frog kick * frog kingdom * frog legs * froglike * * frogly * frogman * frogmarch, frog-march * frogmouth * frog orchid * frogpond, frog pond * frog pose * The Frog Prince * Frog Prince * frog's-bit * frog's legs * frogspawn, frog spawn * frog spit * frog spittle * frog sticker * frogstool * ghost frog * glass frog * * Kermit the Frog (metathesis: > Kermit the Forg, Kermit the Gorf, Kermit the Grof) * The Leap-Frog * leapfrog, leap-frog * leapfrogged, leap-frogged * leapfrogging * leapfrog test, leap-frog test, leap frog test * litter frog * male frog test * * marsupial frog * moss frog * * painted frog * parsley frog * poison dart frog * * screeching frog * sedge frog * * shovelnose frog * tailed frog * tongueless frog * tree frog * Tukeit Hill frog * * true frog
    References
    See also
    * amphibian * * tadpole * toad *

    Verb

    (frogg)
  • To hunt or trap frogs.
  • To use a pronged plater to transfer (cells) to another plate.
  • Derived terms
    * frog stitch

    Etymology 2

    From (m), stereotypical food of the French. Compare , from (m), corresponding French term for English, likewise based on stereotypical food.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (offensive) A French person
  • (Canada, offensive) A French-speaking person from Quebec
  • Antonyms
    * (French person) (l)

    References

    *

    Etymology 3

    .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A leather or fabric loop used to attach a sword or bayonet, or its scabbard, to a waist or shoulder belt
  • An ornate fastener for clothing consisting of a button, toggle, or knot, that fits through a loop
  • Verb

    (frogg)
  • To ornament or fasten a coat, etc. with frogs
  • Etymology 4

    Supposedly from sounding similar to "rip it".

    Verb

    (frogg)
  • To unravel (a knitted garment).
  • human

    English

    Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • (notcomp) Of or belonging to the species Homo sapiens or its closest relatives.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-06-07, author=David Simpson
  • , volume=188, issue=26, page=36, magazine=(The Guardian Weekly) , title= Fantasy of navigation , passage=Like most human activities, ballooning has sponsored heroes and hucksters and a good deal in between. For every dedicated scientist patiently recording atmospheric pressure and wind speed while shivering at high altitudes, there is a carnival barker with a bevy of pretty girls willing to dangle from a basket or parachute down to earth.}}
  • (comparable) Having the nature or attributes of a human being.
  • * {{quote-book, year=1922, author=(Ben Travers), title=(A Cuckoo in the Nest)
  • , chapter=1 citation , passage=She was like a Beardsley Salome , he had said. And indeed she had the narrow eyes and the high cheekbone of that creature, and as nearly the sinuosity as is compatible with human symmetry.}}
  • * {{quote-book, year=1963, author=(Margery Allingham), title=(The China Governess)
  • , chapter=20 citation , passage=The story struck the depressingly familiar note with which true stories ring in the tried ears of experienced policemen. No one queried it. It was in the classic pattern of human weakness, mean and embarrassing and sad.}}
  • * 2011 August 17, Holman W. Jenkins, Jr., The Many Wars of Google: Handset makers will learn to live with their new ‘frenemy’]'', ''Business World'', ''[[w:The Wall Street Journal, Wall Street Journal] ,
  • Google wouldn't be human if it didn't want some of this loot, which buying Motorola would enable it to grab.

    Synonyms

    * (l)

    Derived terms

    * human behaviour * human being * human botfly * human capital * human chattel * human chorionic gonadotropin * human-computer interaction * human condition * human death * human development * Human Genome Project * human immunodeficiency virus * human insulin * human interest * humanism * humanist * humanization * humanize * humanizer * human knot * human kind, humankind * humanly * human movement * human nature * humanoid * human papillomavirus * human pyramid * human race * human relations * human resources (HR) * human rights * human trafficking * inhuman * inhumane * nonhuman, non-human * to err is human (human)

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A human being, whether man, woman or child.
  • * {{quote-magazine, year=2013, month=May-June, author= Katie L. Burke
  • , title= In the News , volume=101, issue=3, page=193, magazine=(American Scientist) , passage=Bats host many high-profile viruses that can infect humans , including severe acute respiratory syndrome and Ebola.}}

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (lb) To behave as or become, or to cause to behave as or become, a human.
  • * 2013 , Biosocial Becomings (ISBN 110702563X), page 19:
  • There are, then, many ways of humaning : these are the ways along which we make ourselves and, collaboratively, one another.
  • * 1911 , The collected works of Ambrose Bierce , volume 9, page 362:
  • Statistics

    *

    Anagrams

    * (l)

    References

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