Whine vs Hum - What's the difference?

whine | hum |


As nouns the difference between whine and hum

is that whine is a long-drawn, high-pitched complaining cry or sound while hum is twilight, dusk.

As a verb whine

is to utter a high-pitched cry.

whine

English

Noun

(en noun)
  • a long-drawn, high-pitched complaining cry or sound
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=2012 , date=June 26 , author=Genevieve Koski , title=Music: Reviews: Justin Bieber: Believe , work=The Onion AV Club citation , page= , passage=The 18-year-old Bieber can’t quite pull off the “adult” thing just yet: His voice may have dropped a bit since the days of “Baby,” but it still mostly registers as “angelic,” and veers toward a pubescent whine at times. }}
  • a complaint or criticism
  • Verb

    (whin)
  • To utter a high-pitched cry.
  • To make a sound resembling such a cry.
  • The jet engines whined at take off.
  • To complain or protest with a whine or as if with a whine.
  • To move with a whining sound.
  • The jet whined into the air.
  • To utter with the sound of a whine.
  • The child whined all his complaints.
    Kelly Queen was whining that the boss made him put on his tie.

    Synonyms

    * See also

    hum

    English

    (wikipedia hum)

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A hummed tune, i.e. created orally with lips closed.
  • An often indistinct sound resembling human humming.
  • They could hear a hum coming from the kitchen, and found the dishwasher on.
  • * Shakespeare
  • the shard-borne beetle with his drowsy hums
  • Busy activity, like the buzz of a beehive.
  • (UK, slang) unpleasant odour.
  • (dated) An imposition or hoax; humbug.
  • (obsolete) A kind of strong drink.
  • (Beaumont and Fletcher)

    Verb

    (humm)
  • To make a sound from the vocal chords without pronouncing any real words, with one's lips closed.
  • We are humming happily along with the music.
  • To express by humming.
  • to hum a tune
    ''The hazers ominously hummed "We shall overcome" while they paddled the unruly pledges
  • To drone like certain insects naturally do in motion, or sounding similarly
  • * 1922 , (Virginia Woolf), (w, Jacob's Room) Chapter 2
  • A slight gloom fell upon the table. Jacob was helping himself to jam; the postman was talking to Rebecca in the kitchen; there was a bee humming at the yellow flower which nodded at the open window.
  • To buzz, be busily active like a beehive
  • 'The streets were humming with activity.''
  • To produce low sounds which blend continuously
  • (British) To reek, smell bad.
  • This room really hums — have you ever tried spring cleaning, mate?
  • (British) To deceive, or impose on one by some story or device.
  • (transitive, dated, slang) To flatter by approving; to cajole; to impose on; to humbug.
  • Derived terms

    * hummer * hummingbird * humming-top

    Synonyms

    * bumble * bustle * hustle * buzz * croon * whir

    Anagrams

    *

    Interjection

    (en interjection)
  • hmm; an inarticulate sound uttered in a pause of speech implying doubt and deliberation.
  • (Alexander Pope)
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