Blare vs Howl - What's the difference?

blare | howl |


As nouns the difference between blare and howl

is that blare is (usually singular) a loud sound while howl is the protracted, mournful cry of a dog or a wolf, or other like sound.

As verbs the difference between blare and howl

is that blare is to make a loud sound while howl is to utter a loud, protracted, mournful sound or cry, as dogs and wolves often do.

blare

English

Noun

(en noun)
  • (usually singular) A loud sound.
  • I can hardly hear you over the blare of the radio.
  • *'>citation
  • Dazzling, often garish, brilliance.
  • Verb

  • To make a loud sound.
  • The trumpet blaring in my ears gave me a headache.
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=2011 , date=December 14 , author=Andrew Khan , title=How isolationist is British pop? , work=the Guardian citation , page= , passage=France, even after 30 years of extraordinary synth, electro and urban pop, is still beaten with a stick marked "Johnny Hallyday" by otherwise sensible journalists. Songs that have taken Europe by storm, from the gloriously bleak Belgian disco of Stromae's Alors on Danse to Sexion d'Assaut's soulful Desole blare from cars everywhere between Lisbon and Lublin but run aground as soon as they hit Dover. }}
  • To cause to sound like the blare of a trumpet; to proclaim loudly.
  • * Tennyson
  • To blare its own interpretation.

    Anagrams

    * * * ----

    howl

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • The protracted, mournful cry of a dog or a wolf, or other like sound.
  • A prolonged cry of distress or anguish; a wail.
  • Verb

    (en verb)
  • To utter a loud, protracted, mournful sound or cry, as dogs and wolves often do.
  • * Drayton
  • And dogs in corners set them down to howl .
  • * Shakespeare
  • Methought a legion of foul fiends / Environ'd me about, and howled in my ears.
  • To utter a sound expressive of pain or distress; to cry aloud and mournfully; to lament; to wail.
  • * Bible, Isaiah xiii. 6
  • Howl ye, for the day of the Lord is at hand.
  • To make a noise resembling the cry of a wild beast.
  • * Sir Walter Scott
  • Wild howled the wind.
  • To utter with outcry.
  • to howl derision