Votary vs Hound - What's the difference?

votary | hound | Related terms |

Votary is a related term of hound.


As nouns the difference between votary and hound

is that votary is a person, such as a monk or nun, who lives a religious life according to vows they have made while hound is a dog, particularly a breed with a good sense of smell developed for hunting other animals (hunt hound, hunting hound, hunting dog, hunter).

As an adjective votary

is consecrated by a vow or promise; consequent on a vow; devoted; promised.

As a verb hound is

to persistently harass.

votary

English

Adjective

(en adjective)
  • Consecrated by a vow or promise; consequent on a vow; devoted; promised.
  • * Francis Bacon
  • Votary resolution is made equipollent to custom.

    Noun

    (votaries)
  • A person, such as a monk or nun, who lives a religious life according to vows they have made
  • A devotee of a particular religion or cult
  • A devout or zealous worshipper
  • Someone who is devoted to a particular pursuit etc; an enthusiast.
  • * 1922 , (James Joyce), Chapter 13
  • *:Gerty was dressed simply but with the instinctive taste of a votary of Dame Fashion for she felt that there was just a might that he might be out.
  • Quotations

    ;enthusiast *1893, , Collaboration [http://www.henryjames.org.uk/collab/CLtext.htm] *: He is such a votary of the modern that he was inevitably interested in the girl of the future and had matched one reform with another, being ready to marry without a penny, as the clearest way of expressing his appreciation, this favourable specimen of the type.

    hound

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A dog, particularly a breed with a good sense of smell developed for hunting other animals. (hunt hound, hunting hound, hunting dog, hunter)
  • (by extension) Someone who seeks something.
  • * 1996 , Marc Parent, Turning Stones , , ISBN 0151002045, page 93,
  • On the way out of the building I was asked for my autograph. If I'd known who the signature hound thought I was, I would've signed appropriately.
  • * 2004 , , ISBN 0743486196, page 483,
  • I still do not know if he's taken on this case because he's a glory hound , because he wants the PR, or if he simply wanted to help Anna.
  • (by extension) A male who constantly seeks the company of receptive females.
  • * 1915 , , volume 122, number 787, December 1915, republished in ''Harper's Monthly Magazine , volume 122, December 1915 to May 1916, page 108,
  • "Are you alone, Goodson?
    "She had a good many successors, John."
    "You are such a hound , in that respect, Goodson," said Claywell, "and you have always been such a hound, that it astounds me to find you—unaccompanied."
  • A despicable person.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Boy! false hound !
  • * Elizabeth Walter, Come and Get Me
  • 'You blackmailing hound ,' the parrot said distinctly, in what Hodges recognized as General Derby's voice. Anstruther turned pale.
  • A houndfish.
  • (nautical, in the plural) Projections at the masthead, serving as a support for the trestletrees and top to rest on.
  • A side bar used to strengthen portions of the running gear of a vehicle.
  • In more recent times, hound' has been replaced by ' dog but the sense remains the same.

    Derived terms

    * Afghan hound * autograph hound * bloodhound * clean as a hound's tooth * gazehound * greyhound, grayhound * hold with the hare and run with the hounds * hound dog * houndish * houndlike * houndly * houndstooth * houndy * publicity hound * rock hound * sighthound * wolfhound * boar hound * hell hound * war hound * hounds of war

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To persistently harass.
  • He hounded me for weeks, but I was simply unable to pay back his loan.

    Anagrams

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