Hoot vs Hott - What's the difference?

hoot | hott |


As nouns the difference between hoot and hott

is that hoot is a derisive cry or shout while hott is extractor hood.

As a verb hoot

is to cry out or shout in contempt.

hoot

English

Noun

(en noun)
  • A derisive cry or shout.
  • The cry of an owl.
  • (US, slang) A fun event or person. (See hootenanny)
  • A small particle
  • * 1878 , John Hanson Beadle, Western Wilds, and the Men who Redeem Them , page 611, Jones Brothers, 1878
  • Well, it was Sunday morning, and the wheat nothing like ripe; but it was a chance, and I got onto my reaper and banged down every hoot of it before Monday night.

    Usage notes

    * (small particle) The term is nearly always encountered in a negative sense in such phrases as don't care a hoot'' or ''don't give two hoots . * (derisive cry) The phrase a hoot and a holler'' has a very different meaning to ''hoot and holler''. The former is a short distance, the latter is a verb of ''derisive cry .

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To cry out or shout in contempt.
  • * Dryden
  • Matrons and girls shall hoot at thee no more.
  • To make the cry of an owl.
  • * Shakespeare
  • the clamorous owl that nightly hoots
  • To assail with contemptuous cries or shouts; to follow with derisive shouts.
  • * Jonathan Swift
  • Partridge and his clan may hoot me for a cheat.

    See also

    * hooter * hootenanny

    Anagrams

    * ----

    hott

    English

    Adjective

    (head)
  • (nonstandard, slang)