Storm vs Hot - What's the difference?

storm | hot |


As a proper noun storm

is .

As a noun hot is

a whit, a bit.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

storm

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl) storm, from (etyl) . Related to (l).

Noun

(en noun)
  • Any disturbed state of the atmosphere, especially as affecting the earth's surface, and strongly implying destructive or unpleasant weather.
  • * Shakespeare
  • We hear this fearful tempest sing, / Yet seek no shelter to avoid the storm .
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2012-01
  • , author=Donald Worster , title=A Drier and Hotter Future , volume=100, issue=1, page=70 , magazine= citation , passage=Phoenix and Lubbock are both caught in severe drought, and it is going to get much worse. We may see many such [dust] storms in the decades ahead, along with species extinctions, radical disturbance of ecosystems, and intensified social conflict over land and water. Welcome to the Anthropocene, the epoch when humans have become a major geological and climatic force.}}
  • A violent agitation of human society; a civil, political, or domestic commotion; violent outbreak.
  • The proposed reforms have led to a political storm .
  • * Shakespeare
  • Her sister / Began to scold and raise up such a storm .
  • (meteorology) a wind scale for very strong wind, stronger than a gale, less than a hurricane (10 or higher on the Beaufort scale).
  • (military) A violent assault on a stronghold or fortified position.
  • Hyponyms
    * See also
    Coordinate terms
    * (meteorology) breeze, gale, hurricane
    Derived terms
    * barnstorm * bestorm * duststorm * leafstorm * sandstorm * snowstorm * storm in a tea-kettle * stormlike * stormtrooper * stormy * thunderstorm * windstorm
    See also
    * blizzard

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) stormen, sturmen, from (etyl) .

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To move quickly and noisily like a storm, usually in a state of uproar or anger.
  • She stormed out of the room.
  • To assault (a stronghold or fortification) with military forces.
  • Troops stormed the complex.

    hot

    English

    Alternative forms

    * (physically attractive) hawt (slang, especially Internet''), hott (''slang, especially Internet )

    Adjective

    (hotter)
  • Of an object, having a high temperature.
  • :
  • *
  • *:There was also hairdressing: hairdressing, too, really was hairdressing in those times — no running a comb through it and that was that. It was curled, frizzed, waved, put in curlers overnight, waved with hot tongs;.
  • Of the weather, causing the air to be hot.
  • :
  • Of a person or animal, feeling the sensation of heat, especially to the point of discomfort.
  • :
  • Feverish.
  • Of food, spicy.
  • :
  • (lb) Very good, remarkable, exciting.
  • :
  • Stolen.
  • :
  • (lb) Electrically charged
  • :
  • (lb) Radioactive.
  • (lb) Of a person, very physically or sexually attractive.
  • :
  • Sexual; involving sexual intercourse or sexual excitement.
  • *
  • Popular; in demand.
  • :
  • Very close to finding or guessing something to be found or guessed.
  • :
  • Performing strongly; having repeated successes.
  • *1938 , Harold M. Sherman, "Shooting Stars," Boys' Life (March 1938), Published by Boy Scouts of America, p.5:
  • *:"Keep going! You're hot tonight!" urged Wally.
  • *2002 , Peter Krause & Andy King, Play-By-Play Golf, First Avenue Editions, p.55:
  • *:The ball lands on the fairway, just a couple of yards in front of the green. "Nice shot Sarah! You're hot today!" Jenny says.
  • Fresh; just released.
  • *1960 , Super Markets of the Sixties: Findings, recommendations.- v.2. The plans and sketches, Super Market Institute, p.30:
  • *:A kid can stand in the street and sell newspapers, if the headlines are hot .
  • *2000 , David Cressy, Travesties and transgressions in Tudor and Stuart England: tales of discord and dissension, Oxford University Press, p.34:
  • *:Some of these publications show signs of hasty production, indicating that they were written while the news was hot .
  • Uncomfortable, difficult to deal with; awkward, dangerous, unpleasant.
  • *
  • *
  • *
  • *
  • Synonyms

    * (having a high temperature) heated; see also * (of the weather) baking, boiling, boiling hot, sultry, sweltering * (feeling the sensation of heat) baking, boiling, boiling hot * (feverish) feverish, having a temperature * (spicy) piquant, spicy, tangy * stolen * (electrically charged) live * (radioactive) radioactive * attractive, beautiful, cute, fit, foxy, gorgeous, handsome, hunky, lush, pretty, sexy, studly, tasty, yummy

    Antonyms

    * (having a high temperature) chilled, chilly, cold, cold as ice, freezing, freezing cold, frigid, glacial, ice-cold, icy * (of the weather) cold, freezing, freezing cold, icy * (feeling the sensation of heat) freezing, freezing cold * (spicy) bland, mild * (electrically charged) neutral, dead * (slang) lifeless

    Derived terms

    * a bit hot * as hot as hell, hot as hell * boiling hot * blow hot and cold * catch it hot, get it hot * give it to someone hot * give it to someone hot and strong * go hot and cold * go like hot cakes, sell like hot cakes * have the hots for * hot air * hot and bothered * hot-and-hot * hot bed * hot beef * hot blast * hot-blooded * hot bottle * hot box * hot-brain * hot-brained * hot bulb * hot button * hot cathode * hot chair * hot check * hot chisel * hot-closet * hot cockles * hot coppers * hot cross bun * hot cupboard * hot damn * hot date * hot diggety, hot diggety dog * hot-dip * hot-dipped * hot dipping * hot dog * hot favorite, hot favourite * hot flash, hot flush * hot-flue * hotfoot * hot from the press, hot off the press * hot gospeler, hot gospeller * hot gospeling, hot gospelling * hot hatch * hot-hatch * hothead * hotheaded * hot-hoof * hot-house, hothouse * hot-iron test * hot-key * hot laboratory * hot line, hotline * hotly * hot-making * hot melt, hot-melt adhesive, hot-melt glue * hot metal * hot money * hotness * hot on * hot on someone's heels * hot-panted, hot-pantsed * hot pants * hot pint * hotplate * hotpot * hot potato * hot-press * hot-presser * hot property * hot rod, hotrod * hot-rodder, hotrodder * hot-saw * hot seat * hot set * hot shift * hot shoe * hot-short * hotshot * hot-skull * hot-spirited * hot spot * hot spring * hotspur * hot squat * hot-stopping * hot-stove * hot stuff * hot-swap * hot tap * hot tear * hot tearing * hot-tempered * hotter * hottie * hotting * hottish * hot to trot * hot-trod * hot tub * hot tube * hot under the collar * hot up * hot wall * hot war * hot water * hot wave * hot well * hot wind * hot-wire * hot-wired * hot with * hot-work * hot-working * in hot pursuit * like a cat on hot bricks * make it hot for, make things hot for * run hot * smoking hot * too hot for * too hot to hold

    Verb

  • To heat; to make or become hot.
  • To become lively or exciting.
  • Synonyms

    * hot up; heat, heat up

    Statistics

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    Anagrams

    * 1000 English basic words ----