Polt vs Holt - What's the difference?

polt | holt |


As a noun polt

is a hard knock.

As a proper noun holt is

an english and north-west european topographic surname for someone who lived by a small wood.

polt

English

Noun

(en noun)
  • A hard knock.
  • *1782:' , ''Cecilia, or memoirs of an heiress'' - If he know'd I'd got you the knife, he'd go nigh to give me a good ' polt of the head.
  • (obsolete, rare) A pestle.
  • *1612 , John Smith, Map of Virginia , in Kupperman 1988, p. 138:
  • *:Their corne they rost in the eare greene, and bruising it in a morter of wood with a Polt , lappe it in rowles in the leaves of their corne, and so boyle it for a daintie.
  • Derived terms

    * polt-foot

    Anagrams

    * *

    holt

    English

    Alternative forms

    * hoult

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A small piece of woodland or a woody hill; a copse.
  • *1600 , (Edward Fairfax), The (Jerusalem Delivered) of (w), Book X, ii:
  • *:As when a savage wolf, chas'd from the fold, / To hide his head runs to some holt or wood.
  • * (1809-1892)
  • *:She sent her voice though all the holt Before her, and the park.
  • *1896 , , (A Shropshire Lad), XXXI, line 5
  • *:[the gale] 'Twould blow like this through holt and hanger.
  • The lair of an animal, especially of an otter.
  • References

    * *

    Anagrams

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