Ductile vs Hollow - What's the difference?

ductile | hollow |


As adjectives the difference between ductile and hollow

is that ductile is capable of being pulled or stretched into thin wire by mechanical force without breaking while hollow is (of something solid) having an empty space or cavity inside.

As an adverb hollow is

(colloquial) completely, as part of the phrase beat hollow or beat all hollow.

As a noun hollow is

a small valley between mountains; a low spot surrounded by elevations.

As a verb hollow is

to make a hole in something; to excavate (transitive) or hollow can be to urge or call by shouting; to hollo.

As an interjection hollow is

.

ductile

English

Adjective

(en adjective)
  • Capable of being pulled or stretched into thin wire by mechanical force without breaking.
  • Molded easily into a new form.
  • (rare) Led easily; prone to follow.
  • Synonyms

    * (molded easily) flexible, plastic, pliant; see also * (led easily) tractable

    Antonyms

    * (capable of being pulled into thin wire) brittle

    Coordinate terms

    * malleable

    See also

    * elastic ----

    hollow

    English

    Alternative forms

    * holler

    Etymology 1

    (etyl) holw, holh, from (etyl) . More at cave.

    Adjective

    (er)
  • (of something solid) Having an empty space or cavity inside.
  • a hollow''' tree; a '''hollow sphere
  • (of a sound) Distant]], eerie; echoing, [[reverberate, reverberating, as if in a hollow space; dull, muffled; often low-pitched.
  • a hollow moan
    (Dryden)
  • (figuratively) Without substance; having no real or significant worth; meaningless.
  • a hollow victory
  • (figuratively) Insincere, devoid of validity; specious.
  • a hollow promise
  • Depressed; concave; gaunt; sunken.
  • * Shakespeare
  • With hollow eye and wrinkled brow.
    Derived terms
    * hollow leg

    Adverb

    (-)
  • (colloquial) Completely, as part of the phrase beat hollow or beat all hollow.
  • Etymology 2

    (etyl) holow, earlier holgh, from (etyl) . See above.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A small valley between mountains; a low spot surrounded by elevations.
  • * Prior
  • Forests grew upon the barren hollows .
  • * Tennyson
  • I hate the dreadful hollow behind the little wood.
    He built himself a cabin in a hollow high up in the Rockies.
  • A sunken area or unfilled space in something solid; a cavity, natural or artificial.
  • the hollow of the hand or of a tree
  • (US) A sunken area.
  • (figuratively) A feeling of emptiness.
  • a hollow in the pit of one's stomach

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • to make a hole in something; to excavate (transitive)
  • Etymology 3

    Compare holler.

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To urge or call by shouting; to hollo.
  • * Sir Walter Scott
  • He has hollowed the hounds.

    Interjection

    (en interjection)
  • (Webster 1913)