Hoped vs Hoked - What's the difference?

hoped | hoked |


As verbs the difference between hoped and hoked

is that hoped is (hope) while hoked is (hoke).

hoped

English

Verb

(head)
  • (hope)
  • Anagrams

    *

    hope

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) hope, from (etyl) .

    Noun

  • (uncountable) The belief or expectation that something wished for can or will happen.
  • * , chapter=3
  • , title= Mr. Pratt's Patients , passage=My hopes wa'n't disappointed. I never saw clams thicker than they was along them inshore flats. I filled my dreener in no time, and then it come to me that 'twouldn't be a bad idee to get a lot more, take 'em with me to Wellmouth, and peddle 'em out.}}
  • (countable) The actual thing wished for.
  • (countable) A person or thing that is a source of hope.
  • (Christianity) The virtuous desire for future good.
  • * The Holy Bible, 1 Corinthians 13:13
  • But now abideth faith, hope , love, these three; and the greatest of these is love.
    Derived terms
    * Cape of Good Hope * forlorn hope * great white hope * have one's hope dashed * hope against hope * hope chest * hopeful * hopeless * hoper * hope springs eternal * no-hoper * out of hope * overhope * unhope * wanhope

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) hopen, from (etyl) hopian.

    Verb

    (hop)
  • To want something to happen, with a sense of expectation that it might.
  • * , chapter=10
  • , title= The Mirror and the Lamp , passage=He looked round the poor room, at the distempered walls, and the bad engravings in meretricious frames, the crinkly paper and wax flowers on the chiffonier; and he thought of a room like Father Bryan's, with panelling, with cut glass, with tulips in silver pots, such a room as he had hoped to have for his own.}}
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-06-08, volume=407, issue=8839, page=55, magazine=(The Economist)
  • , title= Obama goes troll-hunting , passage=The solitary, lumbering trolls of Scandinavian mythology would sometimes be turned to stone by exposure to sunlight. Barack Obama is hoping that several measures announced on June 4th will have a similarly paralysing effect on their modern incarnation, the patent troll.}}
  • To be optimistic; be full of hope; have hopes.
  • (obsolete) To place confidence; to trust with confident expectation of good; usually followed by in .
  • * Bible, Psalms cxix. 81
  • I hope in thy word.
  • * Bible, Psalms xlii. 11
  • Why art thou cast down, O my soul? and why art thou disquieted within me? Hope thou in God.
    Usage notes
    * This is a catenative verb that takes the to infinitive . See
    Derived terms
    * hoped for
    See also
    * aspire * desire * expect * look forward * want

    Etymology 3

    Compare Icelandic word for a small bay or inlet.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A sloping plain between mountain ridges.
  • (Scotland) A small bay; an inlet; a haven.
  • (Jamieson)
    (Webster 1913)

    hoked

    English

    Verb

    (head)
  • (hoke)

  • hoke

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl).

    Noun

  • (obsolete)
  • * 1535 , , unnumbered page,
  • Thou shalt make hokes' of golde also, and two wreth? cheynes of pure golde, and shalt fasten them vnto the ' hokes .

    Etymology 2

    From (hokum).

    Verb

    (hok)
  • (slang) To ascribe a false or artificial quality to; to pretend falsely to have some quality or to be doing something, etc.
  • * 1993 , Reed Whittemore, Jack London'', ''Six Literary Lives , page 70,
  • He even checked the Thomas Cooke & Son travel people about how to get'' to the East End (here he was hoking''' a bit), learning that they were ready to advise him on how to journey to any point in the world ''except'' the East End. Then he hailed a cab and found (here he was ' hoking further) that the cab driver didn't know how to get there either.
  • * 1999 , David Lewis, 15: Humean Supervenience Debugged'', ''Papers in Metaphysics and Epistemology , Volume 2, page 228,
  • If we define partitions of alternative cases by means of ingeniously hoked -up properties, we can get the principle to say almost anything we like.
  • * 2008 , Terry Penner, 12: The Forms and the Sciences in Socrates and Plato'', Hugh H. Benson (editor), ''A Companion to Plato , page 179,
  • If it be asked how we come to talk about them, the answer is: for purposes of rejecting these misbegotten creatures of sophistic imaginations, “hoked up” with such things as interest'', ''strength'', and the like, which ''do exist, although only outside of these combinations.
    Derived terms
    * hokey

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • Something contrived or artificial.
  • Etymology 3

    Compare (etyl) howk.

    Verb

    (hok)
  • (Ireland) To scrounge, to grub.
  • * 1987 , , 2010, unnumbered page,
  • When I hoked there, I would find / An acorn and a rusted bolt
  • * 2000 , , The Little Hammer , unnumbered page,
  • We met when I was hoking about in the rocks – just the sort of thing a virtual only child does to put in the day.