Crank vs Hoist - What's the difference?

crank | hoist |


In lang=en terms the difference between crank and hoist

is that crank is to be running at a high level of output or effort while hoist is to be lifted up.

As nouns the difference between crank and hoist

is that crank is a bent piece of an axle or shaft, or an attached arm perpendicular, or nearly so, to the end of a shaft or wheel, used to impart a rotation to a wheel or other mechanical device; also used to change circular into reciprocating motion, or reciprocating into circular motion while hoist is a hoisting device, such as pulley or crane.

As verbs the difference between crank and hoist

is that crank is to turn by means of a crank while hoist is to raise; to lift; to elevate; especially, to raise or lift to a desired elevation, by means of tackle or pulley, as a sail, a flag, a heavy package or weight.

As an adjective crank

is (slang) strange, weird, odd.

crank

English

Adjective

(er)
  • (slang) strange, weird, odd
  • sick; unwell; infirm
  • (nautical, of a ship) Liable to capsize because of poorly stowed cargo or insufficient ballast
  • Full of spirit; brisk; lively; sprightly; overconfident; opinionated.
  • * Udall
  • He who was, a little before, bedrid, was now crank and lusty.
  • * Mrs. Stowe
  • If you strong electioners did not think you were among the elect, you would not be so crank about it.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A bent piece of an axle or shaft, or an attached arm perpendicular, or nearly so, to the end of a shaft or wheel, used to impart a rotation to a wheel or other mechanical device; also used to change circular into reciprocating motion, or reciprocating into circular motion.(rfex)
  • The act of converting power into motion, by turning a crankshaft.
  • Yes, a crank was all it needed to start .
  • (archaic) Any bend, turn, or winding, as of a passage.
  • * (rfdate) Spenser:
  • So many turning cranks these have, so many crooks.
  • (informal) An ill-tempered or nasty person
  • Billy-Bob is a nasty old crank ! He chased my cat away.
  • A twist or turn of the mind; caprice; whim; crotchet; also, a fit of temper or passion.
  • * Carlyle
  • Violent of temper; subject to sudden cranks .
  • (informal, British, dated in US) A person who is considered strange or odd by others. They may behave in unconventional ways.
  • John is a crank because he talks to himself .
  • * 1882 January 14, in Pall Mall Gazette :
  • Persons whom the Americans since Guiteau's trial have begun to designate as ‘cranks’ —that is to say, persons of disordered mind, in whom the itch of notoriety supplies the lack of any higher ambition.
  • (informal) An advocate of a pseudoscience movement.
  • That crank next door thinks he's created cold fusion in his garage.
  • (US, slang) methamphetamine.
  • Danny got abscesses from shooting all that bathtub crank .
  • (rare) A twist or turn in speech; a conceit consisting in a change of the form or meaning of a word.
  • * (rfdate) Milton:
  • Quips, and cranks , and wanton wiles.
  • (obsolete) A sick person; an invalid.
  • * Burton
  • Thou art a counterfeit crank , a cheater.
  • (slang) penis.
  • * 2013 , Reggie Chesterfield, Scoundrel (page 57)
  • It was going to be hard not to blow with a girl like her sucking on his crank .

    Synonyms

    * See also .

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To turn by means of a crank .
  • Motorists had to crank their engine by hand.
  • To turn a crank .
  • He's been cranking all day and yet it refuses to crank.
  • To turn.
  • He's been cranking all day and yet it refuses to crank .
  • To cause to spin via other means, as though turned by a crank.
  • I turn the key and crank the engine; yet it doesn't turn over
    Crank it up!
  • To act in a cranky manner; to behave unreasonably and irritably, especially through complaining.
  • Quit cranking about your spilt milk!
  • To be running at a high level of output or effort.
  • By one hour into the shift, the boys were really cranking .
  • *
  • *
  • *
  • (dated) To run with a winding course; to double; to crook; to wind and turn.
  • * (rfdate) :
  • See how this river comes me cranking in.

    Derived terms

    * crank axle * crank call * crankcase * crank out * crankpin * crank pin * crank shaft * crankstart * crank start * crank up * crank wheel * cranky * turn someone's crank

    hoist

    English

    Verb

  • To raise; to lift; to elevate; especially, to raise or lift to a desired elevation, by means of tackle or pulley, as a sail, a flag, a heavy package or weight.
  • * Alexander Pope
  • They land my goods, and hoist my flying sails.
  • * South
  • hoisting him into his father's throne
  • * 1719:
  • ...but this last was so heavy, I could not hoist it up to get it over the ship's side.
  • * 1883 , (Robert Louis Stevenson), (Treasure Island)
  • Between us, with much trouble, we managed to hoist him upstairs, and laid him on his bed, where his head fell back on the pillow, as if he were almost fainting.
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=2011 , date=October 23 , author=Tom Fordyce , title=2011 Rugby World Cup final: New Zealand 8-7 France , work=BBC Sport citation , page= , passage=And when skipper Richie McCaw hoisted the Webb Ellis Trophy high into the night, a quarter of a century of hurt was blown away in an explosion of fireworks and cheering.}}
  • (historical) To lift someone up to be flogged.
  • To be lifted up.
  • (comptheory) To extract (code) from a loop construct as part of optimization.
  • Usage notes

    * "Hoisted" is about fifteen times more common than "hoist" in US usage as past and past participle. The "hoist" form is also uncommon in the UK except in the expression "hoist by one's own petard".

    Quotations

    * They land my goods, and hoist my flying sails . — * Hoisting him into his father’s throne . —

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A hoisting device, such as pulley or crane.
  • The act of hoisting; a lift.
  • Give me a hoist over that wall.
  • The perpendicular height of a flag, as opposed to the fly, or horizontal length, when flying from a staff.
  • The vertical edge of a flag which is next to the staff.
  • The height of a fore-and-aft sail, next the mast or stay.