Chock vs Hock - What's the difference?

chock | hock |


In lang=en terms the difference between chock and hock

is that chock is to fill up, as a cavity while hock is to disable by cutting the tendons of the hock; to hamstring; to hough.

As nouns the difference between chock and hock

is that chock is any wooden block used as a wedge or filler or chock can be (obsolete) an encounter while hock is a rhenish wine, of a light yellow color, either sparkling or still, from the hochheim region, but often applied to all rhenish wines or hock can be the tarsal joint of a digitigrade quadruped, such as a horse, pig or dog or hock can be , obligation as collateral for a loan.

As verbs the difference between chock and hock

is that chock is to stop or fasten, as with a wedge, or block; to scotch or chock can be (obsolete) to encounter or chock can be to make a dull sound while hock is to disable by cutting the tendons of the hock; to hamstring; to hough or hock can be (senseid)(colloquial) to leave with a pawnbroker as security for a loan or hock can be (us) to bother; to pester; to annoy incessantly.

As an adverb chock

is (nautical) entirely; quite.

chock

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl) choque (compare modern Norman chouque), from (etyl) *?okka (compare Breton ).

Noun

(en noun)
  • Any wooden block used as a wedge or filler
  • (nautical) Any fitting or fixture used to restrict movement, especially movement of a line; traditionally was a fixture near a bulwark with two horns pointing towards each other, with a gap between where the line can be inserted.
  • Blocks made of either wood, plastic or metal, used to keep a parked aircraft in position.
  • * 2000 , Lindbergh: A Biography , by Leonard Mosley, page 82
  • On April 28, 1927, on Dutch Flats, below San Diego, signaled chocks -away to those on the ground below him.

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To stop or fasten, as with a wedge, or block; to scotch.
  • To fill up, as a cavity.
  • * Fuller
  • The woodwork exactly chocketh into joints.
  • (nautical) To insert a line in a chock.
  • Derived terms
    * chock full * chocks away * chock-a-block * unchock

    Adverb

    (-)
  • (nautical) Entirely; quite.
  • chock''' home; '''chock aft

    Etymology 2

    (etyl) choquer. Compare shock (transitive verb).

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (obsolete) An encounter.
  • Verb

    (en verb)
  • (obsolete) To encounter.
  • (Webster 1913)

    Etymology 3

    Onomatopoeic.

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To make a dull sound.
  • * 1913 , D.H. Lawrence,
  • She saw him hurry to the door, heard the bolt chock . He tried the latch.
    ----

    hock

    English

    Etymology 1

    From hockamore, from the name of the German town of .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A Rhenish wine, of a light yellow color, either sparkling or still, from the Hochheim region, but often applied to all Rhenish wines.
  • Etymology 2

    From (etyl) hoch, hough, hocke, from Old English ‘skeleton’)

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • The tarsal joint of a digitigrade quadruped, such as a horse, pig or dog.
  • Meat from that part of a food animal.
  • Derived terms
    * rattle one's hocks

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To disable by cutting the tendons of the hock; to hamstring; to hough.
  • Etymology 3

    .

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (senseid)(colloquial) To leave with a pawnbroker as security for a loan.
  • Noun

    (-)
  • , obligation as collateral for a loan.
  • He needed $750 to get his guitar out of hock at the pawnshop.
  • *
  • Debt.
  • They were in hock to the bank for $35 million.
  • Installment purchase.
  • *
  • Prison.
  • Derived terms
    * Hock Monday * Hock Tuesday

    Etymology 4

    (Hakn a tshaynik) (etyl)

    Alternative forms

    * hak

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (US) To bother; to pester; to annoy incessantly