Slump vs Hobble - What's the difference?

slump | hobble | Related terms |

Slump is a related term of hobble.


As verbs the difference between slump and hobble

is that slump is (lb) to collapse heavily or helplessly while hobble is to fetter by tying the legs; to restrict (a horse) with hobbles.

As nouns the difference between slump and hobble

is that slump is a heavy or helpless collapse; a slouching or drooping posture; a period of poor activity or performance, especially an extended period while hobble is short straps tied between the legs of unfenced horses, allowing them to wander short distances but preventing them from running off.

slump

English

Verb

  • (lb) To collapse heavily or helplessly.
  • *
  • *:“Heavens!” exclaimed Nina, “the blue-stocking and the fogy!—and yours are'' pale blue, Eileen!—you’re about as self-conscious as Drina—slumping there with your hair tumbling ''à la Mérode! Oh, it's very picturesque, of course, but a straight spine and good grooming is better.”
  • (lb) To decline or fall off in activity or performance.
  • * {{quote-news, year=2011, date=October 29, author=Phil McNulty, work=BBC Sport
  • , title= Chelsea 3-5 Arsenal , passage=The Gunners captain demonstrated his importance to the team by taking his tally to an outstanding 28 goals in 27 Premier League games as Chelsea slumped again after their shock defeat at QPR last week.}}
  • (lb) To slouch or droop.
  • (lb) To lump; to throw together messily.
  • * (1788-1856)
  • These different groupsare exclusively slumped together under that sense.
  • To fall or sink suddenly through or in, when walking on a surface, as on thawing snow or ice, a bog, etc.
  • * (Isaac Barrow) (1630-1677)
  • The latter walk on a bottomless quag, into which unawares they may slump .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A heavy or helpless collapse; a slouching or drooping posture; a period of poor activity or performance, especially an extended period.
  • (Scotland, UK, dialect) A boggy place.
  • (Scotland) The noise made by anything falling into a hole, or into a soft, miry place.
  • (Scotland) The gross amount; the mass; the lump.
  • Derived terms

    * slumplike

    Anagrams

    * * ----

    hobble

    English

    Noun

  • (en noun) (usually in plural )
  • Short straps tied between the legs of unfenced horses, allowing them to wander short distances but preventing them from running off.
  • An unsteady, off-balance step.
  • Synonyms

    * tether (rope)

    Verb

  • To fetter by tying the legs; to restrict (a horse) with hobbles.
  • (Charles Dickens)
  • To walk lame, or unevenly.
  • * Dryden
  • The friar was hobbling the same way too.
  • (figurative) To move roughly or irregularly.
  • * Jeffreys
  • The hobbling versification, the mean diction.
  • To perplex; to embarrass.
  • Derived terms

    * hobble skirt * hobbly * unhobble