Falter vs Hobble - What's the difference?

falter | hobble |


As nouns the difference between falter and hobble

is that falter is butterfly while hobble is short straps tied between the legs of unfenced horses, allowing them to wander short distances but preventing them from running off.

As a verb hobble is

to fetter by tying the legs; to restrict (a horse) with hobbles.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

falter

English

Noun

(-)
  • unsteadiness.
  • Verb

    (en verb)
  • To waver or be unsteady.
  • * Wiseman
  • He found his legs falter .
  • (ambitransitive) To stammer; to utter with hesitation, or in a weak and trembling manner.
  • * Byron
  • And here he faltered forth his last farewell.
  • * Milton
  • With faltering speech and visage incomposed.
  • To fail in distinctness or regularity of exercise; said of the mind or of thought.
  • * I. Taylor
  • Here indeed the power of disinct conception of space and distance falters .
  • To stumble.
  • (figuratively) To lose faith or vigor; to doubt or abandon (a cause).
  • *
  • And remember, comrades, your resolution must never falter .
  • To hesitate in purpose or action.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Ere her native king / Shall falter under foul rebellion's arms.
  • To cleanse or sift, as barley.
  • (Halliwell)

    References

    hobble

    English

    Noun

  • (en noun) (usually in plural )
  • Short straps tied between the legs of unfenced horses, allowing them to wander short distances but preventing them from running off.
  • An unsteady, off-balance step.
  • Synonyms

    * tether (rope)

    Verb

  • To fetter by tying the legs; to restrict (a horse) with hobbles.
  • (Charles Dickens)
  • To walk lame, or unevenly.
  • * Dryden
  • The friar was hobbling the same way too.
  • (figurative) To move roughly or irregularly.
  • * Jeffreys
  • The hobbling versification, the mean diction.
  • To perplex; to embarrass.
  • Derived terms

    * hobble skirt * hobbly * unhobble