Hoe vs Hob - What's the difference?

hoe | hob |


As an adjective hoe

is .

As a proper noun hob is

(label) a nickname for robin or robert.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

hoe

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl) howe, from (etyl) houe, from (etyl) . More at (l).

Noun

(en noun)
  • An agricultural tool consisting of a long handle with a flat blade fixed perpendicular to it at the end, used for digging rows.
  • * 2009 , TRU TV, 28 March:
  • It was obvious that it consisted of several blows to the head from the hoe .
  • The horned or piked dogfish.
  • Derived terms
    * backhoe

    Verb

    (d)
  • (ambitransitive) To cut, dig, scrape, turn, arrange, or clean, with this tool.
  • to hoe the earth in a garden
    Every year, I hoe my garden for aeration.
    I always take a shower after I hoe in my garden.
  • To clear from weeds, or to loosen or arrange the earth about, with a hoe.
  • to hoe corn
    Derived terms
    * long row to hoe

    See also

    * mattock * pick * rake

    Etymology 2

    From non-rhotic whore.

    Alternative forms

    * ho

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (US, slang) A prostitute.
  • * 2002 , Eithne Quinn, Nuthin’ But a “G” Thang: The Culture and Commerce of Gangsta Rap
  • […] this chapter […] will […] explore why pimp (and hoe ) characters, with their dramatic staging of gendered and occupational relations […] have taken such hold of the black youth imagination
  • * 2003 , Dan Harrington, The Good Eye
  • At school they had been among the only couples that had not done “it” at the Pimp & Hoe parties that popped up occasionally at the dorm
    Synonyms
    * See also

    Verb

    (d)
  • (US, slang) To act as a prostitute.
  • * 2003 , Da’rel the Relentless One, M. T. Pimp
  • Pimpin’ came so naturally to MT when he and his sisters played pimp and hoe games that one of his sisters wanted to hoe for him when they grew up.

    Etymology 3

    From (etyl) (m).

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A piece of land that juts out towards the sea; a promontory.
  • Usage notes

    * Now used only in placenames e.g. "Plymouth Hoe". ----

    hob

    English

    Etymology 1

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A kind of cutting tool, used to cut the teeth of a gear.
  • (obsolete) The flat projection or iron shelf at the side of a fire grate, where things are put to be kept warm.
  • (Smart)
  • (British) The top cooking surface on a cooker. It typically comprises several cooking elements (often four), also known as 'rings'.
  • *1913 , Lawrence, Sons and Lovers,
  • *:And the first sound in the house was the bang, bang of the poker against the raker, as Morel smashed the remainder of the coal to make the kettle, which was filled and left on the hob , finally boil.
  • A rounded peg used as a target in several games, especially in quoits
  • A male ferret.
  • The hub of a wheel.
  • (Washington)
    Synonyms
    * (cooking surface) cooktop, stovetop, range (US)

    Verb

    (hobb) (Gear cutting) (Hobbing)
  • To create (a gear) by cutting with a hob.
  • To engage in the process of cutting gears with a hob.
  • Etymology 2

    From (etyl) (Hob) (a diminutive of (Robin), an (etyl) diminutive of (Robert)), through its connection with Robin Goodfellow and (later) the devil. Compare (hobgoblin); see (robin).

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (label) a fairy; a sprite; an elf
  • From elves, hobs , and fairies, Defend us, good Heaven! — Beaumont and Fletcher.
  • (label) a countryman; a rustic or yokel
  • (Nares)
    Derived terms
    * play hob with, raise hob

    References

    *

    Anagrams

    * ----