Bat vs Hit - What's the difference?

bat | hit | Related terms |

Bat is a related term of hit.


As an acronym bat

is best available technology; a principle applying to regulations]] on limiting pollutant [[discharge|discharges.

As a noun hit is

.

bat

English

(wikipedia bat)

Etymology 1

Dialectal variant (akin to the dialectal (etyl) term (m)) of (etyl) (m), (m), from (etyl) (compare (etyl) (m), (etyl) ).

Noun

(en noun)
  • Any of the small, nocturnal, flying mammals of the order Chiroptera, which navigate by means of echolocation.
  • *
  • *:The Bat—they called him the Bat. Like a bat' he chose the night hours for his work of rapine; like a '''bat''' he struck and vanished, pouncingly, noiselessly; like a ' bat he never showed himself to the face of the day.
  • *2012 , Suemedha Sood, (bbc.co.uk) Travelwise: Texas love bats] [sic
  • *:As well as being worth millions of dollars to the Texan agriculture industry, these mammals are worth millions of dollars to the state’s tourism industry. Texas is home to the world’s largest known bat' colony (in Comal County), and the world’s largest urban '''bat''' colony (in Austin). '''Bat''' watching is a common activity, with the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department offering more ' bat -viewing sites than anywhere else in the US.
  • (lb) An old woman.
  • A whore who prowls in the dusk/evening like a bat.
  • Synonyms
    * (flying mammal)
    Derived terms
    * Batman * batlike * batshit * battish * batty * blind as a bat * fruit bat * have bats in the belfry * leaf-nosed bat * (little brown bat) * (brown bat) * like a bat out of hell * microbat * moonbat * vampire bat * vesper bat
    See also
    * * * (bat) * (Chiroptera)

    Etymology 2

    (etyl)

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A club made of wood or aluminium used for striking the ball in sports such as baseball, softball and cricket.
  • A turn at hitting the ball with a bat in a game.
  • (two-up) The piece of wood on which the spinner places the coins and then uses for throwing them.Sidney J. Baker, The Australian Language , second edition, 1966, chapter XI section 3, page 242
  • (mining) Shale or bituminous shale.
  • (Kirwan)
  • A sheet of cotton used for filling quilts or comfortables; batting.
  • A part of a brick with one whole end.
  • Synonyms
    * (two-up) kip, stick, kylie, lannet
    Derived terms
    (derived terms) * baseball bat * batless * batman * bats * batsman * cricket bat

    Verb

    (batt)
  • to hit with a bat.
  • to take a turn at hitting a ball with a bat in sports like cricket, baseball and softball, as opposed to fielding.
  • to strike or swipe as though with a bat
  • The cat batted at the toy.
    Derived terms
    * bat five hundred * bat in * bat out * bat up * (verb)
    Hyponyms
    * Myotis

    References

    Etymology 3

    Possibly a variant of bate.

    Verb

  • to flutter: bat one's eyelashes .
  • Usage notes
    Most commonly used in phrase bat an eye, and variants thereof.
    Derived terms
    * bat an eye, bat an eyelash, bat an eyelid

    Etymology 4

    From (etyl) . "batman." Dictionary.com. Dictionary.com Unabridged (v 1.1). Random House, Inc. 2009. Cognate to (m).

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (obsolete) packsaddle
  • Derived terms
    * batman

    References

    hit

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) .

    Verb

  • To strike.
  • #(lb) To administer a blow to, directly or with a weapon or missile.
  • #:
  • #*
  • #*:Orion hit a rabbit once; but though sore wounded it got to the bury, and, struggling in, the arrow caught the side of the hole and was drawn out. Indeed, a nail filed sharp is not of much avail as an arrowhead; you must have it barbed, and that was a little beyond our skill.
  • #*1922-1927 , (Frank Harris), (My Life and Loves)
  • #*:He tried to hit me but I dodged the blow and went out to plot revenge.
  • #*
  • #*:BELLO: (Shouts) Good, by the rumping jumping general! That's the best bit of news I heard these six weeks. Here, don't keep me waiting, damn you! (He slaps her face)
  • #*:BLOOM: (Whimpers) You're after hitting me. I'll tell
  • #*1934 , , The Slugger's Game
  • #*:I hunted him for half a hour, aiming to learn him to hit a man with a table-leg and then run, but I didn't find him.
  • #(lb) To come into contact with forcefully and suddenly.
  • #:
  • #*(John Locke) (1632-1705)
  • #*:If bodies be extension alone, how can they move and hit one against another?
  • #*
  • #*:a dozen apples, each of them near as large as a Bristol barrel, came tumbling about my ears; one of them hit me on the back as I chanced to stoop, and knocked me down flat on my face.
  • #*1882 , (Nathaniel Hawthorne), Doctor Grimshawe's Secret: A romance
  • #*:Meanwhile the street boys kept up a shower of mud balls, many of which hit the Doctor, while the rest were distributed upon his assailants.
  • # To kill a person, usually on the instructions of a third party.
  • #:
  • # To attack, especially amphibiously.
  • #:
  • To briefly visit.
  • :
  • To encounter.
  • :
  • (lb) To attain, to achieve.
  • # To reach or achieve.
  • #:
  • #*2012 , August 1. Owen Gibson in Guardian Unlimited, London 2012: rowers Glover and Stanning win Team GB's first gold medal:
  • #*:And her success with Glover, a product of the National Lottery-funded Sporting Giants talent identification programme, will also spark relief among British officials who were starting to fret a little about hitting their target of equalling fourth in the medal table from Beijing.
  • #(lb) To meet or reach what was aimed at or desired; to succeed, often by luck.
  • #*(William Shakespeare) (1564-1616)
  • #*:And oft it hits / Where hope is coldest and despair most fits.
  • #*(Jonathan Swift) (1667–1745)
  • #*:Millions miss for one that hits .
  • #To guess; to light upon or discover.
  • #*(William Shakespeare) (1564-1616)
  • #*:Thou hast hit it.
  • (lb) To affect negatively.
  • :
  • To make a play.
  • # In blackjack, to deal a card to.
  • #:
  • # To come up to bat.
  • #:
  • #(lb) To take up, or replace by a piece belonging to the opposing player; said of a single unprotected piece on a point.
  • To use; to connect to.
  • :
  • To have sex with.
  • :
  • To inhale an amount of smoke from a narcotic substance, particularly marijuana
  • :
  • Antonyms
    * (manage to touch in the right place) miss
    Derived terms
    (Terms derived from the verb "hit") * don't let the door hit you on the way out * flood-hit (adjective ) * hit a home run * hit a nerve * hit a six * hit a snag * hit above one's weight * hit and run * hit at * hit back * hit below one's weight * hit for six * hit home * hit it an quit it * hit it big * hit it off * hitman * hit on * hit one out of the ballpark * hit one's stride * hit out * hit paydirt * hit the ball twice * hit the books * hit the bottle * hit the bricks * hit the ceiling * hit the deck * hit the dirt * hit the gas * hit the ground running * hit the hay * hit the head * hit the headlines * hit the jackpot * hit the nail on the head * hit the net * hit the pan * hit the pavement * hit the road * hit rock bottom * hit the rock * hit the rocks * hit the roof * hit the sack * hit the silk * hit the skids * hit the spot * hit up * hit upon * hit wicket * hittable * hitter * hitting * not know what hit one * pinch-hit

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A blow; a punch; a striking against; the collision of one body against another; the stroke that touches anything.
  • * Dryden
  • So he the famed Cilician fencer praised, / And, at each hit , with wonder seems amazed.
    The hit was very slight.
  • A success, especially in the entertainment industry.
  • The band played their hit song to the delight of the fans.
  • * Alexander Pope
  • What late he called a blessing, now was wit, / And God's good providence, a lucky hit .
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=2012 , date=February 9 , author=Tasha Robinson , title=Film: Review: Chico & Rita citation , page= , passage=Chico & Rita opens in the modern era, as an aged, weary Chico shines shoes in his native Cuba. Then a song heard on the radio—a hit he wrote and recorded with Rita in their youth—carries him back to 1948 Havana, where they first met. }}
  • An attack on a location, person or people.
  • # In the game of , a correct guess at where one's opponent ship is.
  • (computing, Internet) The result of a search of a computer system or of a search engine
  • (Internet) A measured visit to a web site, a request for a single file from a web server.
  • My site received twice as many hits after being listed in a search engine.
  • An approximately correct answer in a test set.
  • (baseball) The complete play, when the batter reaches base without the benefit of a walk, error, or fielder’s choice.
  • The catcher got a hit to lead off the fifth.
  • (colloquial) A dose of an illegal or addictive drug.
  • Where am I going to get my next hit ?
  • A premeditated murder done for criminal or political purposes.
  • (dated) A peculiarly apt expression or turn of thought; a phrase which hits the mark.
  • a happy hit
  • A game won at backgammon after the adversary has removed some of his men. It counts for less than a gammon.
  • Antonyms
    * (a punch) miss * (success) flop, turkey
    Derived terms
    * banjo hit * base hit * cult hit * direct hit * hit counter * hit list * hit parade * hit point * hit squad * hit test * infield hit * king hit * nervous hit * no hit * one-hit wonder * pinch hit * smash hit * straight hit * take a hit

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) . More at (l). Note 'it.

    Pronoun

  • (dialectal) .
  • * 1922 , Philip Gengembre Hubert, The Atlantic monthly, Volume 130:
  • But how hit was to come about didn't appear.
  • * 1998 , Nancy A. Walker, What's so funny?: humor in American culture:
  • Now, George, grease it good, an' let hit' slide down the hill ' hits own way.
    Derived terms
    * (l) * (l)