Rind vs Hide - What's the difference?

rind | hide |


As nouns the difference between rind and hide

is that rind is a bovine animal, cow, ox, head of cattle while hide is (countable) (mainly british) a covered structure from which hunters, birdwatchers, etc can observe animals without scaring them or hide can be (countable) the skin of an animal or hide can be a medieval land measure equal to the amount of land that could sustain one free family; usually 100 acres forty hides equalled a barony.

As a verb hide is

to put (something) in a place where it will be harder to discover or out of sight or hide can be to beat with a whip made from hide.

rind

English

(wikipedia rind)

Etymology 1

From (etyl) rinde, from Proto-Germanic *rind?. Cognate with (etyl) Rinde.

Noun

(en noun)
  • tree bark
  • A hard, tough outer layer, particularly on food such as fruit, cheese, etc
  • * Shakespeare
  • Sweetest nut hath sourest rind .
  • * Milton
  • Thou canst not touch the freedom of my mind / With all thy charms, although this corporal rind / Thou hast immanacled.
  • The gall, the crust, the insolence; often as "the immortal rind "
  • * 1939 , Roy Forster, Joyous Deliverance , London: Thornton Butterworth, p. 262:
  • Taking the money from a man when he's got his pants down. What are you, a doctor or a tailor's tout? Thirty bucks! If I figured you'd have the rind to touch me that much I'd have lashed them up with a pair of braces!
  • * 1940 , Amy Helen Bell (ed.), London Was Ours: Diaries and Memoirs of the London Blitz, 1940-1941 , published 2002, Kingston, Ontario: Queen's University, ISBN 9780612732810, p. 99:
  • April 9, 1940. Then one of our RAF customers had the rind to suggest that ‘you women ought to give up smoking for the duration you know’. This , when they have the alternative of smoking pipes which is not open to us, [...]
  • *
  • * 2010 , (David Stubbs), Send Them Victorious: England's Path to Glory 2006-2010 , O Books (Zero Books), ISBN 9781846944574, p. 12:
  • [About a football match.] Come the second half and the Trinidadians and Tobagans had the immortal rind to make excursions into the England half, the spectacle of which was deeply offensive to those whose memories extend to those happy days before 1962, when independence was unwisely conferred on this archipelago. Back in those days, a game like this would have presented little anxiety. Any goals scored by the Trinidadians, or Tobagans for that matter, would have been instantly become the property of the Crown and therefore added to England's tally. Glad times – 22 men working together for a common aim. However, such is the insolence of the modern age that these dark fellows dared approach the England penalty box, forelocks untugged, as if demanding instant entry to the Garrick club without having been put up by existing members.
    Derived terms
    * immortal rind * pork rind
    See also
    * peel * skin

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To remove the rind from.
  • Etymology 2

    Cognate with Flemish (rijne), Low German ryn.

    Alternative forms

    * rynd * rine

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • An iron support fitting used on the upper millstone of a grist mill
  • Anagrams

    * ----

    hide

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) hiden, huden, from (etyl) . Related to (l) and (l).

    Verb

  • To put (something) in a place where it will be harder to discover or out of sight.
  • * 1856 , (Gustave Flaubert), (Madame Bovary), Part III Chapter XI, translated by Eleanor Marx-Aveling
  • The blind man, whom he had not been able to cure with the pomade, had gone back to the hill of Bois-Guillaume, where he told the travellers of the vain attempt of the druggist, to such an extent, that Homais when he went to town hid himself behind the curtains of the "Hirondelle" to avoid meeting him.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-07-19, author=(Timothy Garton Ash)
  • , volume=189, issue=6, page=18, magazine=(The Guardian Weekly) , title= Where Dr Pangloss meets Machiavelli , passage=Hidden behind thickets of acronyms and gorse bushes of detail, a new great game is under way across the globe. Some call it geoeconomics, but it's geopolitics too. The current power play consists of an extraordinary range of countries simultaneously sitting down to negotiate big free trade and investment agreements.}}
  • To put oneself in a place where one will be harder to find or out of sight.
  • * {{quote-magazine, year=2013, month=May-June, author= William E. Conner
  • , title= An Acoustic Arms Race , volume=101, issue=3, page=206-7, magazine=(American Scientist) , passage=Nonetheless, some insect prey take advantage of clutter by hiding in it. Earless ghost swift moths become “invisible” to echolocating bats by forming mating clusters close (less than half a meter) above vegetation and effectively blending into the clutter of echoes that the bat receives from the leaves and stems around them.}}
    Synonyms
    * (transitive) conceal, hide away, secrete * (intransitive) go undercover, hide away, hide oneself, hide out, lie low
    Antonyms
    * (transitive) disclose, expose, reveal, show, uncover * (intransitive) reveal oneself, show oneself
    Derived terms
    * hide and seek / hide-and-seek * hideaway * hideout * hide one's light under a bushel * hider * one can run but one can't hide

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (countable) (mainly British) A covered structure from which hunters, birdwatchers, etc can observe animals without scaring them.
  • Etymology 2

    From (etyl) , 'to cover'. More at (l).

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (countable) The skin of an animal.
  • (obsolete, or, derogatory) The human skin.
  • * Shakespeare
  • O tiger's heart, wrapped in a woman's hide !
  • (uncountable, informal, usually, US) One's own life or personal safety, especially when in peril.
  • * 1957 , (Ayn Rand), Francisco d'Anconia's speech in (Atlas Shrugged):
  • The rotter who simpers that he sees no difference between the power of money and the power of the whip, ought to learn the difference on his own hide —as I think he will.
    Synonyms
    * (animal skin) pelt, skin * (land measure) carucate
    Derived terms
    * cowhide * damn your hide * have someone's hide * rawhide * tan someone's hide

    Verb

  • To beat with a whip made from hide.
  • * 1891 , Robert Weir, J. Moray Brown, Riding
  • He ran last week, and he was hided , and he was out on the day before yesterday, and here he is once more, and he knows he's got to run and to be hided again.

    Etymology 3

    From (etyl) hide, from (etyl) . More at (l), (l).

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A medieval land measure equal to the amount of land that could sustain one free family; usually 100 acres. Forty hides equalled a barony.