Wherry vs Herry - What's the difference?

wherry | herry |


As a noun wherry

is a light embarcation used to navigate inland waterways.

As a verb herry is

(obsolete) to honour, praise or celebrate or herry can be (transitive|obsolete|scotland).

wherry

English

(wikipedia wherry)

Noun

(wherries)
  • A light embarcation used to navigate inland waterways.
  • A flat-bottomed vessel previously employed by British merchants, notably in East Anglia, sometimes converted into pleasure boats.
  • * 1789 ,
  • Here I used to enjoy myself in playing about the bridge stairs, and often in the watermen's wherries', with other boys. On one of these occasions there was another boy with me in a '''wherry''', and we went out into the current of the river: while we were there two more stout boys came to us in another '''wherry''', and, abusing us for taking the boat, desired me to get into the other '''wherry'''-boat. Accordingly I went to get out of the ' wherry I was in; but just as I had got one of my feet into the other boat the boys shoved it off, so that I fell into the Thames; and, not being able to swim, I should unavoidably have been drowned, but for the assistance of some watermen who providentially came to my relief.
  • * 1928 ,
  • The river was astir early and late with barges, wherries , and craft of every description.
  • A liquor made from the pulp of crab apples after the verjuice is extracted.
  • See also

    * ferry

    herry

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) (m), (m), from (etyl) . See (l), (l).

    Alternative forms

    * (l)

    Verb

  • (obsolete) To honour, praise or celebrate.
  • * 1596 , '', 1805, H. J. Todd (editorial notes), ''The Works of Edmund Spenser , page 185,
  • Thenceforth it firmely was e?tabli?hed, / And for Apolloes temple highly herried .
    Derived terms
    * (l) * (l)

    Etymology 2

    From earlier (m), from (etyl) (m), . More at (l).

    Alternative forms

    * (l)

    Verb

  • (transitive, obsolete, Scotland)
  • * 1728 , Robert Lindsay, Robert Freebairn, The History of Scotland: From 21 February, 1436, to March, 1565 , page 44,
  • In the Spring of the Year thereafter, this inte?tine War, within the Bowels of this Commonweal, began to increase ay more and more; and ?o continued two Years; during the which Time, the Dougla??es burnt and herried all Lands pertaining to the King and his A??i?ters; and al?o to them that were not plain on his Faction.
  • * 1822 , , The Three Perils of Man; Or, War, Women, and Witchcraft , page 228,
  • The heroic Sim flew to horse, and desired all that were friends to the Scots to follow, while Laidlaw addressed his compeers, saying, "Up, lads, and let us ride; our host must not be herried while we are under his roof."
  • * , The Deer-Stalkers of Glenskiach , 1840, page 38,
  • The victories of Inverlochy, of Alderne, and of Alford, the herrying of Argyleshire, and the sacking of Dundee, could scarcely make up for the terrible toils encountered in climhing the bleak precipices of the west, in wading through drifts of snow among the mountains during the depths of winter,.
    Derived terms
    * (l) * (l)