Scoff vs Her - What's the difference?

scoff | her |


As nouns the difference between scoff and her

is that scoff is derision; ridicule; a derisive or mocking expression of scorn, contempt, or reproach or scoff can be (south africa) food while her is .

As verbs the difference between scoff and her

is that scoff is to jeer; laugh at with contempt and derision or scoff can be (british) to eat food quickly while her is (lb).

scoff

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl) scof/skof, of Scandinavian origin. Compare (etyl) skaup, Danish skuffelse(noun)/skuffe(verb) and Old High German scoph.

Noun

(en noun)
  • Derision; ridicule; a derisive or mocking expression of scorn, contempt, or reproach.
  • * Shakespeare
  • With scoffs , and scorns, and contumelious taunts.
  • * 1852 , The Dublin University Magazine (page 66)
  • There were sneers, and scoffs , and inuendoes of some; prophecies of failure in a hundred ways
  • An object of scorn, mockery, or derision.
  • * Cowper
  • The scoff of withered age and beardless youth.
    Synonyms
    * derision, ridicule * See also

    Verb

  • To jeer; laugh at with contempt and derision.
  • * Goldsmith
  • Truth from his lips prevailed with double sway, / And fools who came to scoff , remained to pray.
    Synonyms
    * contemn, deride, sneer

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl).

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (South Africa) Food.
  • Verb

  • (British) To eat food quickly.
  • (South Africa) To eat.
  • Synonyms
    * (eat quickly) (l), (l) (US)

    See also

    * scuff

    her

    English

    (wikipedia her)

    Alternative forms

    *

    Determiner

  • Belonging to her.
  • This is her book

    Pronoun

  • The form of she used after a preposition or as the object of a verb; that woman, that ship, etc.
  • Give it to her (after preposition)
    He wrote her a letter (indirect object)
    He treated her for a cold (direct object)
  • * February 1896 , Ground-swells'', by Jeannette H. Walworth, published in ''Lippincott's Monthly Magazine ; page 183:
  • "Then what became of her ?"
    "Her'? Which ‘'''her'''’? The park is full of ‘' hers ’."
    "The lady with the green feathers in her hat. A big Gainsborough hat. I am quite sure it was Miss Hartuff."

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