Wheeze vs Heave - What's the difference?

wheeze | heave |


As nouns the difference between wheeze and heave

is that wheeze is a piping or whistling sound caused by difficult respiration while heave is an effort to raise something, as a weight, or one's self, or to move something heavy.

As verbs the difference between wheeze and heave

is that wheeze is to breathe hard, and with an audible piping or whistling sound, as persons affected with asthma while heave is (archaic) to lift (generally); to raise, or cause to move upwards (particularly in ships or vehicles) or forwards.

wheeze

English

Noun

(en noun)
  • A piping or whistling sound caused by difficult respiration.
  • An ordinary whisper exaggerated so as to produce the hoarse sound known as the "stage whisper"; a forcible whisper with some admixture of tone.
  • (British, slang) An ulterior scheme or plan
  • * 2011 " Road rage; High petrol prices hurt, but will not throttle the economy", The Economist 19 November 2011:
  • The main point of fuel duty, though, is as a fiscal wheeze : it made up 5% of the tax take in 2010.
  • (slang) Something very humorous or laughable.
  • The new comedy is a wheeze .
    You think you're going to win? That's a real wheeze !

    Synonyms

    * See also

    Verb

  • To breathe hard, and with an audible piping or whistling sound, as persons affected with asthma.
  • * 2001 , (Fourth Estate, paperback edition, 443)
  • If the air smelled even faintly of dog, Lionel coughed, wheezed and sneezed.

    heave

    English

    Verb

  • (archaic) To lift (generally); to raise, or cause to move upwards (particularly in ships or vehicles) or forwards.
  • * Herrick
  • Here a little child I stand, / Heaving up my either hand.
  • To lift with difficulty; to raise with some effort; to lift (a heavy thing).
  • We heaved the chest-of-doors on to the second-floor landing.
  • To be thrown up or raised; to rise upward, as a tower or mound.
  • * Alexander Pope
  • And the huge columns heave into the sky.
  • * Gray
  • where heaves the turf in many a mouldering heap
  • * E. Everett
  • the heaving sods of Bunker Hill
  • (transitive, mining, geology) To displace (a vein, stratum).
  • To cause to swell or rise, especially in repeated exertions.
  • The wind heaved the waves.
  • To rise and fall.
  • Her chest heaved with emotion.
  • * Prior
  • Frequent for breath his panting bosom heaves .
  • * Byron
  • the heaving plain of ocean
  • To utter with effort.
  • She heaved a sigh and stared out of the window.
  • * Shakespeare
  • The wretched animal heaved forth such groans.
  • To throw, cast.
  • The cap'n hove the body overboard.
  • (nautical) To pull up with a rope or cable.
  • Heave up the anchor there, boys!
  • (ambitransitive, nautical) To move in a certain direction or into a certain position or situation.
  • to heave the ship ahead
  • :* {{quote-book
  • , year=1914 , year_published= , edition= , editor= , author=Edgar Rice Burroughs , title=At the Earth's Core , chapter= citation , genre= , publisher=The Gutenberg Project , isbn= , page= , passage=The Sagoths were now not over two hundred and fifty yards behind us, and I saw that it was hopeless for us to expect to escape other than by a ruse. There was a bare chance of saving Ghak and Perry, and as I reached the branching of the canyon I took the chance. Pausing there I waited until the foremost Sagoth hove into sight. Ghak and Perry had disappeared around a bend in the left-hand canyon, }}
  • To make an effort to vomit; to retch.
  • To vomit.
  • The smell of the old cheese was enough to make you heave .
  • To make an effort to raise, throw, or move anything; to strain to do something difficult.
  • * Atterbury
  • The Church of England had struggled and heaved at a reformation ever since Wyclif's days.

    Derived terms

    *heave in sight *)

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • An effort to raise something, as a weight, or one's self, or to move something heavy.
  • {{quote-Fanny Hill, part=2 , and now the bed shook, the curtains rattled so, that I could scarce hear the sighs and murmurs, the heaves and pantings that accompanied the action, from the beginning to the end}}
  • An upward motion; a rising; a swell or distention, as of the breast in difficult breathing, of the waves, of the earth in an earthquake, and the like.
  • A horizontal dislocation in a metallic lode, taking place at an intersection with another lode.
  • (nautical) The measure of extent to which a nautical vessel goes up and down in a short period of time. Compare with pitch.