How vs Hawt - What's the difference?

how | hawt |


As nouns the difference between how and hawt

is that how is the means by which something is accomplished or how can be (dialectal) an artificial barrow or tumulus while hawt is horizontal axis wind turbine.

As an adverb how

is to what degree.

As a conjunction how

is in which way; in such way.

As an interjection how

is .

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

how

English

(wikipedia how)

Etymology 1

From (etyl) (m), (m), (m), (m), (etyl) . /hw/ > /h/ due to in (etyl); compare (m), which underwent this change later, and thus is spelt ''wh ((etyl) spelling of /hw/) but pronounced /h/ (it previously had a different vowel, hence avoided the spelling and sound change in Old English). Vowel change per Great Vowel Shift. Akin to (etyl) (m) ((etyl) (m)), . See (m) and compare (m).

Adverb

(-)
  • To what degree.
  • *
  • , title=(The Celebrity), chapter=4 , passage=No matter how early I came down, I would find him on the veranda, smoking cigarettes, or otherwise his man would be there with a message to say that his master would shortly join me if I would kindly wait.}}
  • In what manner.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-08-03, volume=408, issue=8847, magazine=(The Economist)
  • , title= Boundary problems , passage=Economics is a messy discipline: too fluid to be a science, too rigorous to be an art. Perhaps it is fitting that economists’ most-used metric, gross domestic product (GDP), is a tangle too.
  • In what state.
  • How are you?
    How was your vacation?
    Usage notes
    * See usage notes on else. * How good is it?'' means "To what extent is it good?", whereas ''How is it good?'' means "In what manner is it good?". Likewise, ''I know how good it is'' means "I know the extent to which it is good", whereas ''I know how it is good means "I know the manner in which it is good".
    Derived terms
    * how many * how much * how come * how so * know-how

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • The means by which something is accomplished.
  • I am not interested in the why, but in the how .
  • * 1924 , Joseph Rickaby, Studies on God and His Creatures? , p. 102:
  • It is an a posteriori argument, evincing the fact, but not the how .

    Conjunction

    (English Conjunctions)
  • In which way; in such way.
  • I remember how to solve this puzzle.
  • That, the fact that, the way that.
  • * 2010 April 24, Jesse McKinley, “ Don’t Call It ‘Pot’ in This Circle; It’s a Profession]”, in [[w:The New York Times, The New York Times] , page A1:
  • “There’s this real Al Capone fear that they’re going to get our guys, not on marijuana, but on something else,” Mr. Edson said, referring to how Capone was eventually charged with tax evasion rather than criminal activity.

    Etymology 2

    From a (etyl) language, compare (etyl) . Alternatively from (etyl) (m).

    Interjection

    (en-interj)!
  • Etymology 3

    From (etyl) (m).

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (dialectal) An artificial barrow or tumulus.
  • (dialectal) A small hill in northern England. (Usage preserved mainly in place names.)
  • References

    * *

    Statistics

    *

    hawt

    English

    Adjective

    (head)
  • Eye dialect or leet spelling of hot.
  • * 1896, , Break O’ Day , Ayer Publishing (1969), ISBN 0836930630, page 46,
  • “[…] Oh, ’t is, eh? Well, I waant to know — kind o’ hawt in here, ain’t it? Phew!” Again the orange silk handkerchief waved clouds of suffocating musk.
  • * 2005, Lauren Mechling and Laura Moser, The Rise and Fall of a 10th-Grade Social Climber , Graphia Books, ISBN 0618555196, pages 86–87,
  • “Mistah,” I drawled, switching on the Texan twang I perfected not in Houston but as a child in New York watching Dallas'' reruns with my dad. “Ah’m tahrubly sawhruh, but won’t ya tell us what on ''er-yuhth'' we’re a-doin’ wrong?” ¶ […] “We were just having a nice cool refray-yush-munt, Officer—isn’t it so ''hawt ?”
  • * 2006, Robert Eversz, Zero to the Bone: A Nina Zero Novel , Simon and Schuster, ISBN 0743288688, page 24,
  • A few of the comments were marginally pervy, but most were touchingly supportive messages. Ur soooo Hawt !!!'' One comment read. ''I can’t believe ur not gonna be a ***.
  • High; in later use , eye dialect spelling of haut or haute.
  • * c''1560, "Proude Wyues Pater noster", in William Carew Hazlitt (ed.), ''Remains of the Early Popular Poetry of England , J.R. Smith (1866), pages 157–158,
  • Amen —sayd the other, I pray god it be so, / For ye haue good ynoughe, this I do knowe well, / Of good marchaundise, so mote I the, / As any is here in this countre to sell, / For his degre; but he is a frayde / That he sholde passe his state or loke to hawt , / Than behynde your backes it shulde be sayde, / Yf he fare amyss, that it were all your fawt.
  • * a''1900, , "High Finance", in ''Mr. Dooley’s Philosophy , R. H. Russell (1902), page 160,
  • […] ‘Well,’ says I, ‘Cassidy,’ I says, ‘ye’ve been up again th’ pa-apers call hawt finance,’ I says.   ‘What th’ divvle’s that?’ says he.   ‘Well,’ says I, ‘it ain’t burglary, an’ it ain’t obtaining money be false pretinses, an’ it ain’t manslaughter,’ I says.   ‘It’s what ye might call a judicious seliction fr’m th’ best features iv thim ar-rts,’ I says. […]
  • * 2002, , Moving Pictures , HarperCollins, ISBN 0-06-102063-X, page 60,
  • On it was written, in shaky handwriting: ¶ After thys perfromans, Why Notte Visit / Harga’s Hous of Ribs, / For the Best inne Hawt' Cuisyne ¶ “What's ' hawt cuisyne?” said Victor.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • * 1880, , ''Heroines of Fiction , Harper and Brothers (1903), page 242,
  • She looked up suddenly and took a quick breath, as if to resume, but her eyes fell before his, and she said, in a tone of half-soliloquy: ‘I ’ave so much troub’ wit dad hawt .’ She lifted one little hand feebly to the cardiac region, and sighed softly, with a dying languor.
  • * 1896, , "When Malindy Sings", in Joan R. Sherman, African-American Poetry: An Anthology, 1773–1927 , Courier Dover Publications (1997), ISBN 0486296040, pages 64–65,
  • […] / But fu’ real melojous music, / Dat jes’ strikes yo’ hawt and clings, / Jes’ you stan’ an’ listen wif me, / When Malindy sings.
  • * 2004, Oliver T. Beard, Bristling with Thorns , Kessinger Publishing, ISBN 1417915277, page 163,
  • “Deah mistus, cry way down in you hawt , but you’ll git inter mistrouble sho’ if dey sees teahs for de po’ Yanks. Dat yo’ will, honey.”

    Pronoun

    (head)
  • (obsolete) Anything. ()
  • * c''1500, anonymous, "Robin Hood and the Potter", in Francis James Child, ''English and Scottish Ballads , Sampson Low (1861), page 29,
  • “Her het ys merey to be,” seyde Roben, / “For a man that had hawt to spende; / Be mey horne we schall awet / Yeff Roben Hode be ner hande.”