Dawt vs Hawt - What's the difference?

dawt | hawt |


As a verb dawt

is (scottish) to fondle or caress.

As a noun hawt is

horizontal axis wind turbine.

dawt

English

Alternative forms

* daut

Verb

(en verb)
  • (Scottish) To fondle or caress.
  • * 1788', , ''To '''Dawt on Me'', in 2004 [1886], ''The Complete Works of Robert Burns , Part Two, page 163,
  • To dawt' on me, and me sae young, / Wi' his fause heart and flatt'ring tongue, / That is the thing you shall never see, / For an auld man shall never ' dawt on me.
  • * c.18thC , in 1976, Thomas Crawford (editor), Love, Labour, and Liberty: the eighteenth-century Scottish lyric , page 79,
  • Let him kiss her, clap her, and dawt her, / And gie her benevolence due, / And that will a thrifty wife mak her, / And sae I'll bid farewell to you.
  • * c.1882-1896 , ,
  • He courted her and he brought her hame, / An thought she would prove a thrifty dame. / She could nether spin nor caird, / But sit in her chair and dawt the laird.

    hawt

    English

    Adjective

    (head)
  • Eye dialect or leet spelling of hot.
  • * 1896, , Break O’ Day , Ayer Publishing (1969), ISBN 0836930630, page 46,
  • “[…] Oh, ’t is, eh? Well, I waant to know — kind o’ hawt in here, ain’t it? Phew!” Again the orange silk handkerchief waved clouds of suffocating musk.
  • * 2005, Lauren Mechling and Laura Moser, The Rise and Fall of a 10th-Grade Social Climber , Graphia Books, ISBN 0618555196, pages 86–87,
  • “Mistah,” I drawled, switching on the Texan twang I perfected not in Houston but as a child in New York watching Dallas'' reruns with my dad. “Ah’m tahrubly sawhruh, but won’t ya tell us what on ''er-yuhth'' we’re a-doin’ wrong?” ¶ […] “We were just having a nice cool refray-yush-munt, Officer—isn’t it so ''hawt ?”
  • * 2006, Robert Eversz, Zero to the Bone: A Nina Zero Novel , Simon and Schuster, ISBN 0743288688, page 24,
  • A few of the comments were marginally pervy, but most were touchingly supportive messages. Ur soooo Hawt !!!'' One comment read. ''I can’t believe ur not gonna be a ***.
  • High; in later use , eye dialect spelling of haut or haute.
  • * c''1560, "Proude Wyues Pater noster", in William Carew Hazlitt (ed.), ''Remains of the Early Popular Poetry of England , J.R. Smith (1866), pages 157–158,
  • Amen —sayd the other, I pray god it be so, / For ye haue good ynoughe, this I do knowe well, / Of good marchaundise, so mote I the, / As any is here in this countre to sell, / For his degre; but he is a frayde / That he sholde passe his state or loke to hawt , / Than behynde your backes it shulde be sayde, / Yf he fare amyss, that it were all your fawt.
  • * a''1900, , "High Finance", in ''Mr. Dooley’s Philosophy , R. H. Russell (1902), page 160,
  • […] ‘Well,’ says I, ‘Cassidy,’ I says, ‘ye’ve been up again th’ pa-apers call hawt finance,’ I says.   ‘What th’ divvle’s that?’ says he.   ‘Well,’ says I, ‘it ain’t burglary, an’ it ain’t obtaining money be false pretinses, an’ it ain’t manslaughter,’ I says.   ‘It’s what ye might call a judicious seliction fr’m th’ best features iv thim ar-rts,’ I says. […]
  • * 2002, , Moving Pictures , HarperCollins, ISBN 0-06-102063-X, page 60,
  • On it was written, in shaky handwriting: ¶ After thys perfromans, Why Notte Visit / Harga’s Hous of Ribs, / For the Best inne Hawt' Cuisyne ¶ “What's ' hawt cuisyne?” said Victor.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • * 1880, , ''Heroines of Fiction , Harper and Brothers (1903), page 242,
  • She looked up suddenly and took a quick breath, as if to resume, but her eyes fell before his, and she said, in a tone of half-soliloquy: ‘I ’ave so much troub’ wit dad hawt .’ She lifted one little hand feebly to the cardiac region, and sighed softly, with a dying languor.
  • * 1896, , "When Malindy Sings", in Joan R. Sherman, African-American Poetry: An Anthology, 1773–1927 , Courier Dover Publications (1997), ISBN 0486296040, pages 64–65,
  • […] / But fu’ real melojous music, / Dat jes’ strikes yo’ hawt and clings, / Jes’ you stan’ an’ listen wif me, / When Malindy sings.
  • * 2004, Oliver T. Beard, Bristling with Thorns , Kessinger Publishing, ISBN 1417915277, page 163,
  • “Deah mistus, cry way down in you hawt , but you’ll git inter mistrouble sho’ if dey sees teahs for de po’ Yanks. Dat yo’ will, honey.”

    Pronoun

    (head)
  • (obsolete) Anything. ()
  • * c''1500, anonymous, "Robin Hood and the Potter", in Francis James Child, ''English and Scottish Ballads , Sampson Low (1861), page 29,
  • “Her het ys merey to be,” seyde Roben, / “For a man that had hawt to spende; / Be mey horne we schall awet / Yeff Roben Hode be ner hande.”