Haw vs Hawm - What's the difference?

haw | hawm |


As a proper noun haw

is .

As a verb hawm is

(uk|dialect) to lounge; to loiter.

As a noun hawm is

(straw).

haw

English

Etymology 1

Imitative

Interjection

(en interjection)
  • An imitation of laughter, often used to express scorn or disbelief. Often doubled or tripled (haw haw'' or ''haw haw haw ).
  • You think that song was good? Haw!
  • An intermission or hesitation of speech, with a sound somewhat like "haw"; the sound so made.
  • * Congreve
  • Hums or haws .
    Usage notes
    * (an imitation of laughter) In the US, the spelling haw is rare, with (ha) being more common.

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To stop, in speaking, with a sound like haw ; to speak with interruption and hesitation.
  • Derived terms
    * hum and haw, hem and haw

    Etymology 2

    (etyl) hawe, from (etyl) ).

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • Fruit of the hawthorn.
  • (historical) A hedge.
  • Etymology 3

    Unknown

    Interjection

    (en interjection)
  • An instruction for a horse or other animal to turn towards the driver, typically left.
  • Verb

    (en verb)
  • (of an animal) To turn towards the driver, typically to the left.
  • This horse won't haw when I tell him to.
  • To cause (an animal) to turn left.
  • You may have to go to the front of the pack and physically haw the lead dog.
    Derived terms
    * gee haw whimmy diddle * haw and gee, haw and gee about
    Antonyms
    * (to turn left) gee * (to cause to turn left) gee

    Etymology 4

    Uncertain.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (anatomy) The third eyelid, or nictitating membrane.
  • (Webster 1913)

    Anagrams

    * * ----

    hawm

    English

    Etymology 1

    Uncertain.

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (UK, dialect) To lounge; to loiter.
  • (Tennyson)

    Etymology 2

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (straw)
  • (Webster 1913)