Kite vs Hawk - What's the difference?

kite | hawk |


As nouns the difference between kite and hawk

is that kite is a bird of prey of the family accipitridae belonging to one of the following groups: or kite can be the stomach; belly or kite can be (label) a weight-measure unit from ancient egypt, equivalent to 01 deben while hawk is a diurnal predatory bird of the family accipitridae or hawk can be a plasterer's tool, made of a flat surface with a handle below, used to hold an amount of plaster prior to application to the wall or ceiling being worked on: a mortarboard or hawk can be an effort to force up phlegm from the throat, accompanied with noise.

As verbs the difference between kite and hawk

is that kite is to fly a kite while hawk is to hunt with a hawk or hawk can be to sell; to offer for sale by outcry in the street; to carry (merchandise) about from place to place for sale; to peddle or hawk can be (intransitive) to cough up something from one's throat.

kite

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl) (m), (m), from (etyl) .

Alternative forms

* (l)

Noun

(en noun)
  • A bird of prey of the family Accipitridae belonging to one of the following groups:
  • # Any bird of subfamily Milvinae, with long wings and weak legs, feeding mostly on carrion and spending long periods soaring.
  • # A bird of genus Elanus , having thin pointed wings, that preys on rodents and hunts by hovering. Also, any bird of related genera in the subfamily Elaninae.
  • A lightweight toy or other device carried on the wind and tethered and controlled from the ground by one or more lines.
  • A tethered object which deflects its position in a medium by obtaining lift and drag in reaction with its relative motion in the medium.
  • * {{quote-news, 1906, September 12, , Water Kites, Fairbanks Evening News, page=2 citation
  • , passage=The purpose of the water kite is to float beneath or beside the ship at a depth sufficient to insure safety.}}
  • (label) A quadrilateral having two pairs of edges of equal length, the edges of each pair being consecutive.
  • (label) A fraudulent draft, such as a check one drawn on insufficient funds or with altered face value.
  • * {{quote-news, 1991, May 21, Alex Barnum, Suspect Named in Kiting Case, San Jose Mercury News citation
  • , passage= But she said, "if this was a kite , he didn't realize that you don't have the float time of the old days," which made check-kiting easier. }}
  • (label) A planetary configuration wherein one planet of a grand trine is in opposition to an additional fourth planet.
  • * {{quote-book, 2002, Erin Sullivan, Retrograde Planets: Traversing the Inner Landscape, page=144-145 citation
  • , passage=Frequently a kite formation is created by one of the planets in the trine by its opposition to another planet, which allows expulsion and redirection of the pent-up energy associated with a closed circuit.}}
  • (label) An aircraft, or aeroplane.
  • * {{quote-book, 2004, Harry Foxley, Marking Time: An Account Of Ordinary Soldiering, page=133 citation
  • , passage=This time, the engine roared and the kite rocked against the brakes then sluggishly rolled down the strip.}}
  • A lightweight sail set above the topgallants, such as a studding-sail.
  • * {{quote-book, 1863, , 3= English Traits, page=33
  • , passage=Our good master keeps his kites up to the last moment, studding-sails alow and aloft, and, by incessant straight steering, never loses a rod of way.}}
  • A spinnaker.
  • A short letter.
  • (label) A rapacious person.
  • * Shakespeare
  • A fish, the brill.
  • Derived terms
    {{der3, black kite , box kite , go fly a kite , high as a kite , kiteboarding , kite buggy , kite fishing , kite surfing , powerkite , stunt kite , yellow-billed kite}}

    Verb

    (kit)
  • To fly a kite.
  • To glide in the manner of a kite.
  • To travel by kite, as when kitesurfing.
  • To toss or cast.
  • * {{quote-book, 1942, , Phantom Lady, page=189 citation
  • , passage=Lombard swung at the sweet pea he had dropped, caught it neatly with the toe of his shoe, and kited it upward with grim zest, as though doing that made him feel a lot better.}}
  • (label) To write a check on an account with insufficient funds, expecting that funds will become available by the time the check clears.
  • (label) To cause an increase, especially in costs.
  • (label) To keep ahead of (a pursuing monster or mob) in order to attack it repeatedly from a distance, without exposing oneself to danger.
  • * {{quote-book, 2001, Juanita Jones, Everquest Player's Guide: Prima's Official Strategy Guide, page=87 citation
  • , passage=If you're pulling or kiting a creature and it aggros an innocent passer-by, it's your fault and you should apologize.}}
  • To deflect sideways in the water.
  • * {{quote-us-patent, 1973, Clarence K. Chatten, Weather Resistant Segmented Fairing for a Tow Cable, 3899991 citation
  • , passage=This column action causes the tow line to kite either to the port or the starboard side,
  • To send a short letter.
  • * {{quote-book, 1966, Rose Giallombardo, Society of Women: A Study of a Women's Prison citation
  • , passage=I have been working like a dam mule this morning and just found time to kite you.}}
  • To steal.
  • * {{quote-book, 1994, , The Shawshank Redemption, page=36 citation
  • , passage= Andy also kept a box of that in his cell, although he didn't get it from me — I imagine he kited it from the prison laundry.}}
  • (label) To hunt with a hawk.
  • (Francis Bacon)
    Derived terms
    * check kiting * kiter

    See also

    * * *

    Etymology 2

    Origin uncertain. Possibly from (etyl) .

    Alternative forms

    * (Scotland)

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • The stomach; belly.
  • Etymology 3

    Probably from Ancient Egyptian.

    Noun

    (kite)
  • (label) A weight-measure unit from Ancient Egypt, equivalent to 0.1 deben
  • Anagrams

    * ----

    hawk

    English

    (wikipedia hawk)

    Etymology 1

    (etyl) hauk, from (etyl) hafoc, from (etyl) 'falcon', (etyl) kobuz 'Eurasian Hobby').

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A diurnal predatory bird of the family Accipitridae .
  • It is illegal to hunt hawks or other raptors in many parts of the world.
  • (politics) An advocate of aggressive political positions and actions; a warmonger.
  • * 1990 , (Peter Hopkirk), The Great Game , Folio Society 2010, p. 106:
  • A hawk by nature, Ellenborough strongly favoured presenting St Petersburg with an ultimatum warning that any further incursions into Persia would be regarded as a hostile act.
    Antonyms
    * (politics) dove
    Derived terms
    * African harrier hawk * aspere-hawk * ball hawk * bay-winged hawk * bee hawk * between hawk and buzzard * bicoloured hawk * black hawk * broad-winged hawk * brown hawk * chicken hawk, chicken-hawk, chickenhawk * common black hawk * Cooper's hawk * deficit hawk * dor-hawk, dorhawk, dorrhawk * dove hawk * duck hawk, duck-hawk * eagle hawk, eagle-hawk, eaglehawk * ferruginous hawk * fish hawk, fish-hawk, fishhawk * * game hawk * gnat hawk, gnat-hawk * gray hawk, grey hawk * gray-lined hawk, grey-lined hawk * great black hawk * great-footed hawk * Gundlach's hawk * Harlan's hawk * harrier hawk * Harris hawk, Harris's hawk * have eyes like a hawk * Hawaiian hawk * hawk-beaked * hawk-bell * hawkbill * hawk-cuckoo * hawk-dove game * hawk eagle * hawked * hawker * hawkery * hawk-eye * hawk-eyed * hawkfish * hawk fly, hawk-fly * hawk-headed parrot * hawkish * hawk-kite * hawk-like, hawklike * hawk moth, hawk-moth, hawkmoth * hawk nose, hawk-nose, hawknose * hawk-nosed * hawk-nut, hawknut * hawk of the fist * hawk of the lure * hawk of the soar * hawk owl, hawk-owl * hawk-parrot * hawk's beard, hawk's-beard, hawksbeard * hawk's bell * hawk's bill, hawk's-bill, hawksbill * hawk's-bill turtle, hawksbill turtle * hawk's eye, hawk's-eye * hawk's-feet, hawk's-foot * hawk's meat * hawk swallow, hawk-swallow * hawkweed * hawkwise * hawky * hen hawk, hen-hawk * hobby hawk * hover-hawk * jack-hawk * jashawk * Jayhawk * kitchen hawk * know a hawk from a handsaw * Krider's hawk * lark-hawk * liberal hawk * long-tailed hawk * Lucifer hawk * make-hawk * man-of-war hawk * mangrove black hawk * mar-hawk * market-hawk * marsh hawk * meadowhawk * moor hawk * mosquito hawk * moth-hawk * mountain hawk * mouse hawk, mouse-hawk * news-hawk, newshawk * night hawk, night-hawk * pap-hawk * partridge-hawk * passage hawk * peregrine hawk * pigeon hawk, pigeon-hawk * plain-breasted hawk * pondhawk * prairie hawk * quail hawk * red-shouldered hawk * red-tailed hawk * Ridgway's hawk * ringtail hawk * rough-legged hawk * rufous-thighed hawk * savanna hawk * screech hawk, screech-hawk * sea hawk, sea-hawk * semicollared hawk * sharp-shinned hawk * shite-hawk * short-tailed hawk * shower hawk * skeeter hawk * small-bird-hawk * snake hawk * snipe hawk * spar-hawk, sparhawk * sparrow hawk, sparrow-hawk, sparrowhawk * squirrel hawk * stand hawk * stannel hawk * star-hawk * stone hawk * Swainson's hawk * swallow-tailed hawk * tarantula hawk * tiny hawk * vanner hawk * war hawk, war-hawk * watch (someone or something) like a hawk * whistling hawk * white-breasted hawk * white-throated hawk * white hawk * zone-tailed hawk

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To hunt with a hawk.
  • * 2003 , Brenda Joyce, House of Dreams , page 175:
  • He rode astride while (hawking); she falconed in the ladylike position of sidesaddle.
  • To make an attack while on the wing; to soar and strike like a hawk.
  • to hawk at flies
    (Dryden)
  • * Shakespeare
  • A falcon, towering in her pride of place, / Was by a mousing owl hawked at and killed.
    Derived terms
    * hawk after * hawk at * hawk for * hawking

    Etymology 2

    Uncertain origin; perhaps from (etyl) , or from a variant use of .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A plasterer's tool, made of a flat surface with a handle below, used to hold an amount of plaster prior to application to the wall or ceiling being worked on: a mortarboard.
  • Synonyms
    * mortarboard
    Derived terms
    * hawk boy, hawk-boy

    Etymology 3

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To sell; to offer for sale by outcry in the street; to carry (merchandise) about from place to place for sale; to peddle.
  • The vendors were hawking their wares from little tables lining either side of the market square.
  • * Jonathan Swift
  • His works were hawked in every street.
    Derived terms
    * hawked * hawking * hawky

    Etymology 4

    Onomatopoeia.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • An effort to force up phlegm from the throat, accompanied with noise.
  • Synonyms
    * (noun)

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (intransitive) To cough up something from one's throat.
  • * 1751 , , I. xvi. 117
  • He hawked up, with incredible straining, the interjection ah!
  • * 1953 , , Viking Press, chapter 3:
  • He had a new tough manner of pulling down breath and hawking into the street.
  • (intransitive) To try to cough up something from one's throat; to clear the throat loudly.
  • Grandpa sat on the front porch, hawking and wheezing, as he packed his pipe with cheap tobacco.
    Derived terms
    * (noun)

    See also

    * Hawkshaw, hawkshaw * Hawkubite * winkle-hawk English onomatopoeias