Hawk vs Bower - What's the difference?

hawk | bower |


As nouns the difference between hawk and bower

is that hawk is a diurnal predatory bird of the family accipitridae or hawk can be a plasterer's tool, made of a flat surface with a handle below, used to hold an amount of plaster prior to application to the wall or ceiling being worked on: a mortarboard or hawk can be an effort to force up phlegm from the throat, accompanied with noise while bower is a bedroom or private apartments, especially for a woman in a medieval castle or bower can be a peasant; a farmer or bower can be either of the two highest trumps in euchre or bower can be (nautical) a type of ship's anchor, carried at the bow or bower can be (obsolete|falconry) a young hawk, when it begins to leave the nest.

As verbs the difference between hawk and bower

is that hawk is to hunt with a hawk or hawk can be to sell; to offer for sale by outcry in the street; to carry (merchandise) about from place to place for sale; to peddle or hawk can be (intransitive) to cough up something from one's throat while bower is to embower; to enclose.

hawk

English

(wikipedia hawk)

Etymology 1

(etyl) hauk, from (etyl) hafoc, from (etyl) 'falcon', (etyl) kobuz 'Eurasian Hobby').

Noun

(en noun)
  • A diurnal predatory bird of the family Accipitridae .
  • It is illegal to hunt hawks or other raptors in many parts of the world.
  • (politics) An advocate of aggressive political positions and actions; a warmonger.
  • * 1990 , (Peter Hopkirk), The Great Game , Folio Society 2010, p. 106:
  • A hawk by nature, Ellenborough strongly favoured presenting St Petersburg with an ultimatum warning that any further incursions into Persia would be regarded as a hostile act.
    Antonyms
    * (politics) dove
    Derived terms
    * African harrier hawk * aspere-hawk * ball hawk * bay-winged hawk * bee hawk * between hawk and buzzard * bicoloured hawk * black hawk * broad-winged hawk * brown hawk * chicken hawk, chicken-hawk, chickenhawk * common black hawk * Cooper's hawk * deficit hawk * dor-hawk, dorhawk, dorrhawk * dove hawk * duck hawk, duck-hawk * eagle hawk, eagle-hawk, eaglehawk * ferruginous hawk * fish hawk, fish-hawk, fishhawk * * game hawk * gnat hawk, gnat-hawk * gray hawk, grey hawk * gray-lined hawk, grey-lined hawk * great black hawk * great-footed hawk * Gundlach's hawk * Harlan's hawk * harrier hawk * Harris hawk, Harris's hawk * have eyes like a hawk * Hawaiian hawk * hawk-beaked * hawk-bell * hawkbill * hawk-cuckoo * hawk-dove game * hawk eagle * hawked * hawker * hawkery * hawk-eye * hawk-eyed * hawkfish * hawk fly, hawk-fly * hawk-headed parrot * hawkish * hawk-kite * hawk-like, hawklike * hawk moth, hawk-moth, hawkmoth * hawk nose, hawk-nose, hawknose * hawk-nosed * hawk-nut, hawknut * hawk of the fist * hawk of the lure * hawk of the soar * hawk owl, hawk-owl * hawk-parrot * hawk's beard, hawk's-beard, hawksbeard * hawk's bell * hawk's bill, hawk's-bill, hawksbill * hawk's-bill turtle, hawksbill turtle * hawk's eye, hawk's-eye * hawk's-feet, hawk's-foot * hawk's meat * hawk swallow, hawk-swallow * hawkweed * hawkwise * hawky * hen hawk, hen-hawk * hobby hawk * hover-hawk * jack-hawk * jashawk * Jayhawk * kitchen hawk * know a hawk from a handsaw * Krider's hawk * lark-hawk * liberal hawk * long-tailed hawk * Lucifer hawk * make-hawk * man-of-war hawk * mangrove black hawk * mar-hawk * market-hawk * marsh hawk * meadowhawk * moor hawk * mosquito hawk * moth-hawk * mountain hawk * mouse hawk, mouse-hawk * news-hawk, newshawk * night hawk, night-hawk * pap-hawk * partridge-hawk * passage hawk * peregrine hawk * pigeon hawk, pigeon-hawk * plain-breasted hawk * pondhawk * prairie hawk * quail hawk * red-shouldered hawk * red-tailed hawk * Ridgway's hawk * ringtail hawk * rough-legged hawk * rufous-thighed hawk * savanna hawk * screech hawk, screech-hawk * sea hawk, sea-hawk * semicollared hawk * sharp-shinned hawk * shite-hawk * short-tailed hawk * shower hawk * skeeter hawk * small-bird-hawk * snake hawk * snipe hawk * spar-hawk, sparhawk * sparrow hawk, sparrow-hawk, sparrowhawk * squirrel hawk * stand hawk * stannel hawk * star-hawk * stone hawk * Swainson's hawk * swallow-tailed hawk * tarantula hawk * tiny hawk * vanner hawk * war hawk, war-hawk * watch (someone or something) like a hawk * whistling hawk * white-breasted hawk * white-throated hawk * white hawk * zone-tailed hawk

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To hunt with a hawk.
  • * 2003 , Brenda Joyce, House of Dreams , page 175:
  • He rode astride while (hawking); she falconed in the ladylike position of sidesaddle.
  • To make an attack while on the wing; to soar and strike like a hawk.
  • to hawk at flies
    (Dryden)
  • * Shakespeare
  • A falcon, towering in her pride of place, / Was by a mousing owl hawked at and killed.
    Derived terms
    * hawk after * hawk at * hawk for * hawking

    Etymology 2

    Uncertain origin; perhaps from (etyl) , or from a variant use of .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A plasterer's tool, made of a flat surface with a handle below, used to hold an amount of plaster prior to application to the wall or ceiling being worked on: a mortarboard.
  • Synonyms
    * mortarboard
    Derived terms
    * hawk boy, hawk-boy

    Etymology 3

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To sell; to offer for sale by outcry in the street; to carry (merchandise) about from place to place for sale; to peddle.
  • The vendors were hawking their wares from little tables lining either side of the market square.
  • * Jonathan Swift
  • His works were hawked in every street.
    Derived terms
    * hawked * hawking * hawky

    Etymology 4

    Onomatopoeia.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • An effort to force up phlegm from the throat, accompanied with noise.
  • Synonyms
    * (noun)

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (intransitive) To cough up something from one's throat.
  • * 1751 , , I. xvi. 117
  • He hawked up, with incredible straining, the interjection ah!
  • * 1953 , , Viking Press, chapter 3:
  • He had a new tough manner of pulling down breath and hawking into the street.
  • (intransitive) To try to cough up something from one's throat; to clear the throat loudly.
  • Grandpa sat on the front porch, hawking and wheezing, as he packed his pipe with cheap tobacco.
    Derived terms
    * (noun)

    See also

    * Hawkshaw, hawkshaw * Hawkubite * winkle-hawk English onomatopoeias

    bower

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) ).

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A bedroom or private apartments, especially for a woman in a medieval castle.
  • * Gascoigne
  • Give me my lute in bed now as I lie, / And lock the doors of mine unlucky bower .
  • (literary) A dwelling; a picturesque country cottage, especially one that is used as a retreat.
  • (Shenstone)
  • A shady, leafy shelter or recess in a garden or woods.
  • * 1599 ,
  • say that thou overheard'st us,
    And bid her steal into the pleached bower ,
    Where honey-suckles, ripen'd by the sun,
    Forbid the sun to enter;
  • * {{quote-book, year=1907, author=
  • , title=The Dust of Conflict , chapter=1 citation , passage=
  • (ornithology) A large structure made of grass and bright objects, used by the bower bird during courtship displays.
  • Synonyms
    *

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To embower; to enclose.
  • (Shakespeare)
  • (obsolete) To lodge.
  • (Spenser)

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) boueer, from (etyl) .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A peasant; a farmer.
  • Etymology 3

    From (etyl) Bauer.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • Either of the two highest trumps in euchre.
  • Derived terms
    * best bower * left bower * right bower

    Etymology 4

    From the bow of a ship

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (nautical) A type of ship's anchor, carried at the bow.
  • One who bows or bends.
  • A muscle that bends a limb, especially the arm.
  • * Spenser
  • His rawbone arms, whose mighty brawned bowers / Were wont to rive steel plates and helmets hew.

    Etymology 5

    From bough, compare brancher.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (obsolete, falconry) A young hawk, when it begins to leave the nest.
  • (Webster 1913)