Haunt vs Haven - What's the difference?

haunt | haven |


As verbs the difference between haunt and haven

is that haunt is to inhabit, or visit frequently (most often used in reference to ghosts) while haven is to put into, or provide with a haven.

As nouns the difference between haunt and haven

is that haunt is a place at which one is regularly found; a hangout while haven is a harbour or anchorage protected from the sea.

haunt

English

Alternative forms

* (l) (Scotland)

Verb

(en verb)
  • To inhabit, or visit frequently (most often used in reference to ghosts).
  • A couple of ghosts haunt the old, burnt-down house.
  • * Shakespeare
  • You wrong me, sir, thus still to haunt my house.
  • * Jonathan Swift
  • those cares that haunt the court and town
  • * Fairfax
  • Foul spirits haunt my resting place.
  • To make uneasy, restless.
  • The memory of his past failures haunted him.
  • To stalk, to follow
  • The policeman haunted him, following him everywhere.
  • To live habitually; to stay, to remain.
  • * 1526 , William Tyndale, trans. Bible , John XI:
  • Jesus therfore walked no more openly amonge the iewes: butt went his waye thence vnto a countre ny to a wildernes into a cite called effraym, and there haunted with his disciples.
  • * 1590 , Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene , III.x:
  • yonder in that wastefull wildernesse / Huge monsters haunt , and many dangers dwell
  • To accustom; habituate; make accustomed to.
  • * Wyclif
  • Haunt thyself to pity.
  • To practise; to devote oneself to.
  • * Ascham
  • Leave honest pleasure, and haunt no good pastime.
  • To persist in staying or visiting.
  • * Shakespeare
  • I've charged thee not to haunt about my doors.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A place at which one is regularly found; a hangout.
  • *
  • * 1868 , , "Kitty's Class Day":
  • Both Jack and Fletcher had graduated the year before, but still took an interest in their old haunts , and patronized the fellows who were not yet through.
  • * 1984 , Timothy Loughran and Natalie Angier, " Science: Striking It Rich in Wyoming," Time , 8 Oct.:
  • Wyoming has been a favorite haunt of paleontologists for the past century ever since westering pioneers reported that many vertebrate fossils were almost lying on the ground.
  • (dialect) A ghost.
  • * 1891 , Mary Noailles Murfree, In the "Stranger People's" Country , Nebraska 2005, p. 93:
  • Harnts don't wander much ginerally,’ he said. ‘They hand round thar own buryin'-groun' mainly.’
  • A feeding place for animals.Oxford English Dictionary , 2nd ed., 1989.
  • References

    Anagrams

    *

    haven

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A harbour or anchorage protected from the sea.
  • * Shakespeare
  • what shipping and what lading's in our haven
  • * Tennyson
  • their haven under the hill
  • (by extension) A place of safety; a refuge or sanctuary.
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=2011 , date=December 21 , author=Helen Pidd , title=Europeans migrate south as continent drifts deeper into crisis , work=the Guardian citation , page= , passage=Since its conception, the European Union has been a haven for those seeking refuge from war, persecution and poverty in other parts of the world.}}

    Synonyms

    * refuge * sanctuary * zoar

    Derived terms

    * tax haven

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To put into, or provide with a haven.
  • Anagrams

    * ----