Agitate vs Haunt - What's the difference?

agitate | haunt |


As verbs the difference between agitate and haunt

is that agitate is to move with a violent, irregular action; as, the wind agitates the sea; to agitate water in a vessel while haunt is to inhabit, or visit frequently (most often used in reference to ghosts).

As a noun haunt is

a place at which one is regularly found; a hangout.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

agitate

English

(Webster 1913)

Verb

(agitat)
  • To move with a violent, irregular action; as, the wind agitates the sea; to agitate water in a vessel.
  • ``Winds . . . agitate the air.'' --Cowper.
  • (rare) To move or actuate.
  • :(Thomson)
  • To stir up; to disturb or excite; to perturb; as, he was greatly agitated.
  • The mind of man is agitated by various passions. --Johnson.
  • To discuss with great earnestness; to debate; as, a controversy hotly agitated.
  • :(Boyle)
  • To revolve in the mind, or view in all its aspects; to contrive busily; to devise; to plot; as, politicians agitate desperate designs.
  • Synonyms

    * move, shake, excite, rouse, disturb, distract, revolve, discuss, debate, canvass

    haunt

    English

    Alternative forms

    * (l) (Scotland)

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To inhabit, or visit frequently (most often used in reference to ghosts).
  • A couple of ghosts haunt the old, burnt-down house.
  • * Shakespeare
  • You wrong me, sir, thus still to haunt my house.
  • * Jonathan Swift
  • those cares that haunt the court and town
  • * Fairfax
  • Foul spirits haunt my resting place.
  • To make uneasy, restless.
  • The memory of his past failures haunted him.
  • To stalk, to follow
  • The policeman haunted him, following him everywhere.
  • To live habitually; to stay, to remain.
  • * 1526 , William Tyndale, trans. Bible , John XI:
  • Jesus therfore walked no more openly amonge the iewes: butt went his waye thence vnto a countre ny to a wildernes into a cite called effraym, and there haunted with his disciples.
  • * 1590 , Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene , III.x:
  • yonder in that wastefull wildernesse / Huge monsters haunt , and many dangers dwell
  • To accustom; habituate; make accustomed to.
  • * Wyclif
  • Haunt thyself to pity.
  • To practise; to devote oneself to.
  • * Ascham
  • Leave honest pleasure, and haunt no good pastime.
  • To persist in staying or visiting.
  • * Shakespeare
  • I've charged thee not to haunt about my doors.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A place at which one is regularly found; a hangout.
  • *
  • * 1868 , , "Kitty's Class Day":
  • Both Jack and Fletcher had graduated the year before, but still took an interest in their old haunts , and patronized the fellows who were not yet through.
  • * 1984 , Timothy Loughran and Natalie Angier, " Science: Striking It Rich in Wyoming," Time , 8 Oct.:
  • Wyoming has been a favorite haunt of paleontologists for the past century ever since westering pioneers reported that many vertebrate fossils were almost lying on the ground.
  • (dialect) A ghost.
  • * 1891 , Mary Noailles Murfree, In the "Stranger People's" Country , Nebraska 2005, p. 93:
  • Harnts don't wander much ginerally,’ he said. ‘They hand round thar own buryin'-groun' mainly.’
  • A feeding place for animals.Oxford English Dictionary , 2nd ed., 1989.
  • References

    Anagrams

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