Leisurely vs Haste - What's the difference?

leisurely | haste |


As an adjective leisurely

is characterized by leisure; taking abundant time; not hurried; as, a leisurely manner; a leisurely walk.

As an adverb leisurely

is in a leisurely manner.

As a noun haste is

speed; swiftness; dispatch.

As a verb haste is

to urge onward; to hasten.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

leisurely

English

Adjective

(en adjective)
  • Characterized by leisure; taking abundant time; not hurried; as, a leisurely manner; a leisurely walk.
  • * 1900', , Chapter I,
  • Warwick passed through one of the wide brick arches and traversed the building with a leisurely step.

    Derived terms

    * leisureliness

    Adverb

    (en adverb)
  • In a leisurely manner.
  • *1943 , (Raymond Chandler), The High Window , Penguin 2005, p. 37:
  • *:Sunset Crescent Drive curved leisurely north from Sunset Boulevard, well beyond the Bel-Air Country Club golf-course.
  • haste

    English

    Noun

    (-)
  • Speed; swiftness; dispatch.
  • We were running late so we finished our meal in haste .
  • * Bible, 1 Sam. xxi. 8
  • The king's business required haste .
  • (obsolete) Hurry; urgency; sudden excitement of feeling or passion; precipitance; vehemence.
  • * Bible, Psalms cxvi. 11
  • I said in my haste , All men are liars.

    Derived terms

    * hasten verb * hastily adverb * hastiness noun * hasty adjective * make haste * posthaste, post haste adverb

    Verb

    (hast)
  • To urge onward; to hasten
  • To move with haste.
  • * {{quote-book, year=1594, author=, title=A Select Collection of Old English Plays, Vol. VII (4th edition), chapter=The Wounds of Civill War, edition= citation
  • , passage=The city is amaz'd, for Sylla hastes To enter Rome with fury, sword and fire. }}
  • * {{quote-book, year=1825, author=Samuel Johnson, title=The Works of Samuel Johnson in Nine Volumes, chapter=, edition= citation
  • , passage=He hastes away to another, whom his affairs have called to a distant place, and, having seen the empty house, goes away disgusted by a disappointment which could not be intended, because it could not be foreseen. }}
  • * {{quote-book, year=1881, author=Thomas Carlyle, title=Past and Present, chapter=, edition= citation
  • , passage=Samson hastes not; but neither does he pause to rest. }}

    References

    Anagrams

    * (l), (l), (l), (l), (l), (l) ----