Haggle vs Hassle - What's the difference?

haggle | hassle |


As verbs the difference between haggle and hassle

is that haggle is to argue for a better deal, especially over prices with a seller while hassle is to trouble, to bother, to annoy.

As a noun hassle is

trouble, bother, unwanted annoyances or problems.

haggle

English

Verb

  • To argue for a better deal, especially over prices with a seller.
  • I haggled for a better price because the original price was too high.
  • To hack (cut crudely)
  • * Shakespeare
  • Suffolk first died, and York, all haggled o'er, / Comes to him, where in gore he lay insteeped.
  • * 1884 : (Mark Twain), (The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn), Chapter VIII
  • I catched a catfish and haggled him open with my saw, and towards sundown I started my camp fire and had supper. Then I set out a line to catch some fish for breakfast.
  • To stick at small matters; to chaffer; to higgle.
  • * Walpole
  • Royalty and science never haggled about the value of blood.

    Synonyms

    * (to argue for a better deal) wrangle

    Derived terms

    * haggler

    See also

    * (l)

    hassle

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • Trouble, bother, unwanted annoyances or problems.
  • I went through a lot of hassle to be the first to get a ticket.
  • A fight or argument.
  • An action which is not worth the difficulty involved.
  • Verb

    (hassl)
  • To trouble, to bother, to annoy.
  • The unlucky boy was hassled by a gang of troublemakers on his way home.
  • To pick a fight or start an argument.
  • Anagrams

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