Harrow vs Disk - What's the difference?

harrow | disk |


As nouns the difference between harrow and disk

is that harrow is a device consisting of a heavy framework having several disks or teeth in a row, which is dragged across ploughed land to smooth or break up the soil, to remove weeds or cover seeds; a harrow plow while disk is a thin, flat, circular plate or similar object.

As verbs the difference between harrow and disk

is that harrow is to drag a harrow over; to break up with a harrow while disk is (agriculture) to harrow.

As a interjection harrow

is (obsolete) a call for help, or of distress, alarm etc.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

harrow

English

Etymology 1

Either representing unattested (etyl) .

Noun

(en noun)
  • A device consisting of a heavy framework having several disks or teeth in a row, which is dragged across ploughed land to smooth or break up the soil, to remove weeds or cover seeds; a harrow plow.
  • * 1918 , Louise & Aylmer Maude, trans. Leo Tolstoy, Anna Karenina , Oxford 1998, p. 153:
  • He sent for the carpenter, who was under contract to be with the threshing-machine, but it turned out that he was mending the harrows , which should have been mended the week before Lent.
  • * {{quote-book
  • , year=1960 , author= , title=(Jeeves in the Offing) , section=chapter X , passage=“It may be fun for her,” I said with one of my bitter laughs, “but it isn't so diverting for the unfortunate toads beneath the harrow whom she plunges so ruthlessly in the soup.”}}
  • * 1969 , Bessie Head, When Rain Clouds Gather , Heinemann 1995, p. 28:
  • Part of your job would be to learn tractor ploughing and the use of planters, harrows , and cultivators.
  • (military) An obstacle formed by turning an ordinary harrow upside down, the frame being buried.
  • See also
    *

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To drag a harrow over; to break up with a harrow.
  • * Bible, Job xxxix. 10
  • Will he harrow the valleys after thee?
  • * 1719
  • When the corn was sown, I had no harrow, but was forced to go over it myself, and drag a great heavy bough of a tree over it, to scratch it, as it may be called, rather than rake or harrow it.
  • To traumatize or disturb; to frighten or torment.
  • The headless horseman harrowed Ichabod Crane as he tried to reach the bridge.
  • To break or tear, as with a harrow; to wound; to lacerate; to torment or distress; to vex.
  • * Rowe
  • my aged muscles harrowed up with whips
  • * Shakespeare
  • I could a tale unfold, whose lightest word / Would harrow up thy soul.
    Derived terms
    * harrowing * Harrowing of Hell

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) haro, harou, of uncertain origin.

    Interjection

    (en interjection)
  • (obsolete) A call for help, or of distress, alarm etc.
  • * 1590 , Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene , II.vi:
  • Harrow , the flames, which me consume (said hee) / Ne can be quencht, within my secret bowels bee.

    References

    disk

    English

    (wikipedia disk)

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A thin, flat, circular plate or similar object.
  • A coin is a disk of metal.
  • Something resembling a disk.
  • Venus' disk cut off light from the Sun.
  • An .
  • A vinyl phonograph/gramophone record.
  • Turn the disk over, after it has finished.
  • A floppy disk - removable magnetic medium or a hard disk - fixed, persistent digital storage.
  • He still uses floppy disks from 1979.
  • A disc - either a CD-ROM, an audio CD, a DVD or similar removable storage medium.
  • She burned some disks yesterday to back up her computer.
  • A harrow.
  • A ring- or cup-shaped enlargement of the flower receptacle or ovary that bears nectar or, less commonly, the stamens.
  • Usage notes

    In International English, disk'' is the correct spelling for magnetic ''disks''. If the medium is optical, the variant ''disc'' is usually preferred, although computing is a peculiar field for the term. For instance hard disk and other disk drives are always thus spelled, yet so are terms like compact discs. Thus, if referring to a physical drive or older media (3" or 5.25" diskettes) the ''k'' is used, but ''c is used for newer (optical based) media. Less commonly, in British English, disc'' has been used for magnetic disks, as in ''floppy disc'' and ''discette .

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (agriculture) to harrow
  • * {{quote-book, year=1916, author=Various, title=Trees, Fruits and Flowers of Minnesota, 1916, chapter=, edition= citation
  • , passage=That is alkali. Mr. Kochendorfer: I have a ten-year apple orchard that I disked last year and kept it tolerably clean this spring. }}
  • * {{quote-book, year=1948, author=Various, title=Northern Nut Growers Association Incorporated 39th Annual Report, chapter=, edition= citation
  • , passage=The next year I plowed and disked the patch of ground and planted potatoes. }}
  • * {{quote-news, year=1991, date=September 6, author=Jerry Sullivan, title=Field & Street, work=Chicago Reader citation
  • , passage=The soil is plowed and disked and then seeded with a mixture of prairie plants. }}

    Anagrams

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