Harlequin vs Pierrot - What's the difference?

harlequin | pierrot |


As nouns the difference between harlequin and pierrot

is that harlequin is a pantomime fool, typically dressed in checkered clothes while pierrot is .

As an adjective harlequin

is brightly coloured, especially in a pattern like that of a harlequin clown's clothes.

As a verb harlequin

is to remove or conjure away, as if by a harlequin's trick.

harlequin

English

Noun

(en noun)
  • a pantomime fool, typically dressed in checkered clothes
  • * 1749, Henry Fielding, The History of Tom Jones, a Foundling
  • ... were certainly the worst and dullest company into which an audience was ever introduced; and (which was a secret known to few) were actually intended so to be, in order to contrast the comic part of the entertainment, and to display the tricks of harlequin to the better advantage.
  • A yellowish-green color.
  • Usage notes

    * Because of its origin in the name of an Italian theatrical character, English Harlequin is often used as a proper name.

    Adjective

    (head)
  • brightly coloured, especially in a pattern like that of a harlequin clown's clothes
  • Of a yellowish-green
  • Derived terms

    * harlequinade * harlequin bat * harlequin beetle * harlequin cabbage bug * harlequin caterpillar * harlequin duck * harlequin moth * harlequin opal * harlequin snake

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To remove or conjure away, as if by a harlequin's trick.
  • * M. Green
  • And kitten, if the humour hit / Has harlequined away the fit.
  • To make sport by playing ludicrous tricks.
  • pierrot

    Proper noun

    (en proper noun)
  • A character from French pantomime; a buffoon in a loose white outfit; a popular choice for a masquerade costume.
  • * 1934 , , Right Ho, Jeeves :
  • And he was attending that fancy-dress ball, mark you--not, like every other well-bred Englishman, as a Pierrot , but as Mephistopheles...
    "He said that the costume of Pierrot , while pleasing to the eye, lacked the authority of the Mephistopheles costume."

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