Harass vs Squeeze - What's the difference?

harass | squeeze |


As verbs the difference between harass and squeeze

is that harass is to fatigue or to tire with repeated and exhausting efforts while squeeze is to apply pressure to from two or more sides at once.

As nouns the difference between harass and squeeze

is that harass is (obsolete) devastation; waste while squeeze is a difficult position.

harass

English

Verb

(es)
  • To fatigue or to tire with repeated and exhausting efforts.
  • *
  • , title=(The Celebrity), chapter=4 , passage=No matter how early I came down, I would find him on the veranda, smoking cigarettes, or
  • To annoy endlessly or systematically; to molest.
  • * 1877 , (Anna Sewell), (Black Beauty) Chapter 23[http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Black_Beauty/23]
  • In my old home, I always knew that John and my master were my friends; but here, although in many ways I was well treated, I had no friend. York might have known, and very likely did know, how that rein harassed me; but I suppose he took it as a matter of course that could not be helped; at any rate nothing was done to relieve me.
  • To put excessive burdens upon; to subject to anxieties.
  • in the early 1940s.

    Synonyms

    * hassle * harry * chivy or chivvy * chevy or chevvy * beset * plague * molest * provoke

    Derived terms

    * harasser * harassment

    Noun

  • (obsolete) devastation; waste
  • (Milton)
  • (obsolete) worry; harassment
  • (Byron)

    squeeze

    English

    Verb

    (squeez)
  • To apply pressure to from two or more sides at once
  • I squeezed the ball between my hands.
    Please don't squeeze the toothpaste tube in the middle.
  • * 1922 , (Virginia Woolf), (w, Jacob's Room) Chapter 1
  • "Over there—by the rock," Steele muttered, with his brush between his teeth, squeezing out raw sienna, and keeping his eyes fixed on Betty Flanders's back.
  • (ambitransitive) To fit into a tight place
  • I managed to squeeze the car into that parking space.
    Can you squeeze through that gap?
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=2010 , date=December 29 , author=Sam Sheringham , title=Liverpool 0 - 1 Wolverhampton , work=BBC citation , page= , passage=It was an omen of things to come as in the 56th minute the visitors took the lead after a mix-up between Skrtel and Sotirios Kyrgiakos allowed Ebanks-Blake's through-ball to squeeze between them.}}
  • * 1908 ,
  • Could he not squeeze under the seat of a carriage? He had seen this method adopted by schoolboys, when the journey- money provided by thoughtful parents had been diverted to other and better ends.
  • To remove something with difficulty, or apparent difficulty
  • He squeezed some money out of his wallet.
  • To put in a difficult position by presenting two or more choices
  • I'm being squeezed between my job and my volunteer work.
  • * 2013 May 23, , " British Leader’s Liberal Turn Sets Off a Rebellion in His Party," New York Times (retrieved 29 May 2013):
  • At a time when Mr. Cameron is being squeezed from both sides — from the right by members of his own party and by the anti-immigrant, anti-Europe U.K. Independence Party, and from the left by his Liberal Democrat coalition partners — the move seemed uncharacteristically clunky.
  • (figurative) To oppress with hardships, burdens, or taxes; to harass.
  • * L'Estrange
  • In a civil war, people must expect to be crushed and squeezed toward the burden.
  • (baseball) To attempt to score a runner from third by bunting
  • Jones squeezed in Smith with a perfect bunt.

    Derived terms

    (terms derived from the verb "squeeze") * squeezable * squeezebox * squeeze in * squeeze out * squeezer * squeezy * unsqueeze

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A difficult position
  • I'm in a tight squeeze right now when it comes to my free time.
  • A traversal of a narrow passage
  • It was a tight squeeze , but I got through to the next section of the cave.
  • A hug or other affectionate grasp
  • a gentle squeeze on the arm
  • (slang) A romantic partner
  • I want to be your main squeeze
  • (baseball) The act of bunting in an attempt to score a runner from third
  • The game ended in exciting fashion with a failed squeeze .
  • (epigraphy) An impression of an inscription formed by pressing wet paper onto the surface and peeling off when dry.
  • The light not being good enough for photography, I took a squeeze of the stone.
  • (card games) A play that forces an opponent to discard a card that gives up one or more tricks.
  • (archaic) A bribe or fee paid to a middleman, especially in China.
  • See also

    * squash * squeegee * squish * margin squeeze