Puss vs Harass - What's the difference?

puss | harass |


As nouns the difference between puss and harass

is that puss is (informal) a cat or puss can be (slang) the mouth while harass is (obsolete) devastation; waste.

As a verb harass is

to fatigue or to tire with repeated and exhausting efforts.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

puss

English

Etymology 1

From a Common (etyl) word for cat. Akin to (etyl) , West Frisian (m), (etyl) (m), (m), Danish (m), dialectal (etyl) (m), (etyl) (m). Found also in several other European and Western Asian languages. Compare (etyl) (m).

Noun

(es)
  • (informal) A cat.
  • Our local theatre is showing Puss in Boots.
  • A girl or young woman.
  • (dated, hunting) A hare.
  • (vulgar, slang) Vulva (female genitalia).
  • Synonyms
    * (cat) moggie/moggy

    Etymology 2

    Of (etyl) origin, from or akin to (etyl) .

    Noun

    (es)
  • (slang) The mouth.
  • She gave him a slap in the puss .
    Synonyms
    * (mouth) cakehole, gob, mush, trap

    Anagrams

    * ----

    harass

    English

    Verb

    (es)
  • To fatigue or to tire with repeated and exhausting efforts.
  • *
  • , title=(The Celebrity), chapter=4 , passage=No matter how early I came down, I would find him on the veranda, smoking cigarettes, or
  • To annoy endlessly or systematically; to molest.
  • * 1877 , (Anna Sewell), (Black Beauty) Chapter 23[http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Black_Beauty/23]
  • In my old home, I always knew that John and my master were my friends; but here, although in many ways I was well treated, I had no friend. York might have known, and very likely did know, how that rein harassed me; but I suppose he took it as a matter of course that could not be helped; at any rate nothing was done to relieve me.
  • To put excessive burdens upon; to subject to anxieties.
  • in the early 1940s.

    Synonyms

    * hassle * harry * chivy or chivvy * chevy or chevvy * beset * plague * molest * provoke

    Derived terms

    * harasser * harassment

    Noun

  • (obsolete) devastation; waste
  • (Milton)
  • (obsolete) worry; harassment
  • (Byron)