Resolve vs Handle - What's the difference?

resolve | handle |


As verbs the difference between resolve and handle

is that resolve is (resolver) while handle is to use the hands.

As a noun handle is

a part of an object which is held in the hand when used or moved, as the haft of a sword, the knob of a door, the bail of a kettle, etc or handle can be (slang) a name, nickname or pseudonym.

resolve

English

Verb

(resolv)
  • To find a solution to (a problem).
  • To reduce to simple or intelligible notions; to make clear or certain; to unravel; to explain.
  • to resolve a riddle
  • * Shakespeare
  • Resolve my doubt.
  • To solve again.
  • To make a firm decision to do something.
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  • To determine or decide in purpose; to make ready in mind; to fix; to settle.
  • He was resolved by an unexpected event.
  • To come to an agreement or make peace; patch up relationship, settle differences, bury the hatchet.
  • (transitive, intransitive, reflexive) To break down into constituent parts; to decompose; to disintegrate; to return to a simpler constitution or a primeval state.
  • * Shakespeare
  • O, that this too too solid flesh would melt, / Thaw, and resolve itself into a dew!
  • * Dryden
  • Ye immortal souls, who once were men, / And now resolved to elements again.
  • * {{quote-magazine, year=2013, month=July-August, author= Fenella Saunders, magazine=(American Scientist)
  • , title= Tiny Lenses See the Big Picture , passage=The single-imaging optic of the mammalian eye offers some distinct visual advantages. Such lenses can take in photons from a wide range of angles, increasing light sensitivity. They also have high spatial resolution, resolving incoming images in minute detail.}}
  • To cause to perceive or understand; to acquaint; to inform; to convince; to assure; to make certain.
  • * Alexander Pope
  • Resolve me, Reason, which of these is worse, / Want with a full, or with an empty purse?
  • * Sir Walter Raleigh
  • In health, good air, pleasure, riches, I am resolved it can not be equalled by any region.
  • * Milton
  • We must be resolved how the law can be pure and perspicuous, and yet throw a polluted skirt over these Eleusinian mysteries.
  • (music) To cause a chord to go from dissonance to consonance.
  • (computing) To find the IP address of a hostname, or the entity referred to by a symbol in source code; to look up.
  • (rare) To melt; to dissolve; to liquefy or soften (a solid).
  • (rare, intransitive, reflexive) To melt; to dissolve; to become liquid.
  • * Arbuthnot
  • When the blood stagnates in any part, it first coagulates, then resolves , and turns alkaline.
  • (obsolete) To liquefy (a gas or vapour).
  • (medicine, dated) To disperse or scatter; to discuss, as an inflammation or a tumour.
  • (obsolete) To relax; to lay at ease.
  • (Ben Jonson)

    Derived terms

    * resolvable * resolver

    References

    *

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • Determination, will power.
  • ''It took all my resolve to go through with it.
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=2011 , date=October 1 , author=Saj Chowdhury , title=Wolverhampton 1 - 2 Newcastle , work=BBC Sport citation , page= , passage=Alan Pardew's current squad has been put together with a relatively low budget but the resolve and unity within the team is priceless.}}

    Synonyms

    * fortitude, inner strength, resoluteness, sticktoitiveness, tenacity

    handle

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) handel, handle, from (etyl) .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A part of an object which is held in the hand when used or moved, as the haft of a sword, the knob of a door, the bail of a kettle, etc.
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  • That of which use is made; an instrument for effecting a purpose (either literally or figuratively); a tool.
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  • (Australia, New Zealand) A 10 fl oz (285 ml) glass of beer in the Northern Territory. See also pot, middy for other regional variations.
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  • (American) A half-gallon (1.75-liter) bottle of alcohol.
  • (computing) A reference to an object or structure that can be stored in a variable.
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  • This article describes how to find the module name from the window handle .
  • (gambling) The gross amount of wagering within a given period of time or for a given event at one of more establishments.
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  • The daily handle of a Las Vegas casino is typically millions of dollars.
  • (geography, Newfoundland, and, Labrador, rare) A point, an extremity of land.
  • Handle of the Sug, Nfld.
  • (textiles) The tactile qualities of a fabric, e.g., softness, firmness, elasticity, fineness, resilience, and other qualities perceived by touch.
  • (topology) A topological space homeomorphic to a ball but viewed as a product of two lower-dimensional balls.
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  • Derived terms
    * give a handle * handlebar, handlebars * handlebody * handleless * handling * love handle

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) handlen, from (etyl) .

    Verb

  • To use the hands.
  • * Psalm 115:7:
  • They [idols made of gold and silver] have hands, but they handle not
  • To touch; to feel with the hand.
  • * Luke 24:39:
  • Handle me, and see; for a spirit hath not flesh.
  • To use or hold with the hand.
  • * :
  • About his altar, handling holy things
  • To manage in using, as a spade or a musket; to wield; often, to manage skillfully.
  • * Shakespeare, King Lear , IV-vi:
  • That fellow handles his bow like a crowkeeper
  • To accustom to the hand; to work upon, or take care of, with the hands.
  • * Sir W. Temple:
  • The hardness of the winters forces the breeders to house and handle their colts six months every year
  • To receive and transfer; to have pass through one's hands; hence, to buy and sell
  • a merchant handles a variety of goods, or a large stock
  • To deal with; to make a business of.
  • * Jeremiah, 2:8:
  • They that handle the law knew me not
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=2011 , date=December 16 , author=Denis Campbell , title=Hospital staff 'lack skills to cope with dementia patients' , work=Guardian citation , page= , passage=The findings emerged from questionnaires filled in by 2,211 staff in 145 wards of 55 hospitals in England and Wales and 105 observations of care of dementia patients. Two-thirds of staff said they had not had enough training to provide proper care, 50% said they had not been trained how to communicate properly with such patients and 54% had not been told how to handle challenging or aggressive behaviour.}}
  • To treat; to use, well or ill.
  • * Shakespeare, Henry VI , Part I, I-iv:
  • How wert thou handled being prisoner
  • To manage; to control; to practice skill upon.
  • * Shakespeare, Measure for Measure , V-i:
  • You shall see how I'll handle her
  • To use or manage in writing or speaking; to treat, as a theme, an argument, or an objection.
  • * :
  • We will handle what persons are apt to envy others
  • (soccer) To touch the ball with the hand or arm; to commit handball.
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=2011 , date=February 12 , author=Les Roopanarine , title=Birmingham 1 - 0 Stoke , work=BBC citation , page= , passage=Robert Huth handled a Bentley shot, only for the offence to go unnoticed.}}
    Synonyms
    * feel * finger * touch * deal * manage * treat
    Derived terms
    * to handle without gloves: (colloquial) See under glove * mishandle

    Etymology 3

    Originally Cornish-American, from (etyl) , later hanow (pronounced han'of'' or ''han'o ).

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (slang) A name, nickname or pseudonym.
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