What's the difference between
and
Enter two words to compare and contrast their definitions, origins, and synonyms to better understand how those words are related.

Lever vs Handle - What's the difference?

lever | handle |

Handle is a synonym of lever.



In lang=en terms the difference between lever and handle

is that lever is a levee while handle is a name, nickname or pseudonym.

As nouns the difference between lever and handle

is that lever is   A rigid piece which is capable of turning about one point, or axis (the fulcrum), and in which are two or more other points where forces are applied; — used for transmitting and modifying force and motion while handle is a part of an object which is held in the hand when used or moved, as the haft of a sword, the knob of a door, the bail of a kettle, etc.

As verbs the difference between lever and handle

is that lever is to move with a lever while handle is to use the hands.

As an adverb lever

is rather.

lever

English

(wikipedia lever)

Etymology 1

From (etyl) leveor, ; see levant. Compare alleviate, elevate, leaven.

Noun

(en noun)
  • (mechanics)   A rigid piece which is capable of turning about one point, or axis (the fulcrum ), and in which are two or more other points where forces are applied; — used for transmitting and modifying force and motion.
  • # Specifically, a bar of metal, wood or other rigid substance, used to exert a pressure, or sustain a weight, at one point of its length, by receiving a force or power at a second, and turning at a third on a fixed point called a fulcrum. It is usually named as the first of the six mechanical powers, and is of three kinds, according as either the fulcrum F, the weight W, or the power P, respectively, is situated between the other two, as in the figures.
  • A small such piece to trigger or control a mechanical device (like a button).
  • (mechanics)   A bar, as a capstan bar, applied to a rotatory piece to turn it.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2012-03
  • , author=(Henry Petroski) , title=Opening Doors , volume=100, issue=2, page=112-3 , magazine= citation , passage=A doorknob of whatever roundish shape is effectively a continuum of levers , with the axis of the latching mechanism—known as the spindle—being the fulcrum about which the turning takes place.}}
  • (mechanics)   An arm on a rock shaft, to give motion to the shaft or to obtain motion from it.
  • Verb

  • To move with a .
  • ''With great effort and a big crowbar I managed to lever the beam off the floor.
  • (figuratively) To use, operate like a .
  • To increase the share of debt in the capitalization of a business.
  • *
  • Derived terms

    * leverage * compound lever * lever escapement * lever jack * lever watch * universal lever

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) comparative of of Germanic origin (compare German lieb) or lief.

    Adverb

    (-)
  • (obsolete) Rather.
  • * 1530 , , The Four PP
  • for I had lever be without ye / Then have suche besines about ye
  • * 1537 ,
  • Now therefore take my life from me, for I had lever die then live.
  • * 1590 ,
  • For lever had I die than see his deadly face.

    Etymology 3

    From (etyl) lever.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (rare) A levee.
  • * 1742 , Miss Robinson, Mrs. Delany's Letters , II.191:
  • We do not appear at Phœbus's Levér .
  • * 2011 , Tim Blanning, "The reinvention of the night", Times Literary Supplement , 21 Sep 2011:
  • Louis XIV’s day began with a lever at 9 and ended (officially) at around midnight.

    Anagrams

    * * ----

    handle

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) handel, handle, from (etyl) .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A part of an object which is held in the hand when used or moved, as the haft of a sword, the knob of a door, the bail of a kettle, etc.
  • * '>citation
  • * '>citation
  • *
  • That of which use is made; an instrument for effecting a purpose (either literally or figuratively); a tool.
  • * '>citation
  • * '>citation
  • *
  • (Australia, New Zealand) A 10 fl oz (285 ml) glass of beer in the Northern Territory. See also pot, middy for other regional variations.
  • * '>citation
  • * '>citation
  • *
  • (American) A half-gallon (1.75-liter) bottle of alcohol.
  • (computing) A reference to an object or structure that can be stored in a variable.
  • * '>citation
  • * '>citation
  • This article describes how to find the module name from the window handle .
  • (gambling) The gross amount of wagering within a given period of time or for a given event at one of more establishments.
  • * '>citation
  • * '>citation
  • * '>citation
  • The daily handle of a Las Vegas casino is typically millions of dollars.
  • (geography, Newfoundland, and, Labrador, rare) A point, an extremity of land.
  • Handle of the Sug, Nfld.
  • (textiles) The tactile qualities of a fabric, e.g., softness, firmness, elasticity, fineness, resilience, and other qualities perceived by touch.
  • (topology) A topological space homeomorphic to a ball but viewed as a product of two lower-dimensional balls.
  • * '>citation
  • Derived terms
    * give a handle * handlebar, handlebars * handlebody * handleless * handling * love handle

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) handlen, from (etyl) .

    Verb

  • To use the hands.
  • * Psalm 115:7:
  • They [idols made of gold and silver] have hands, but they handle not
  • To touch; to feel with the hand.
  • * Luke 24:39:
  • Handle me, and see; for a spirit hath not flesh.
  • To use or hold with the hand.
  • * :
  • About his altar, handling holy things
  • To manage in using, as a spade or a musket; to wield; often, to manage skillfully.
  • * Shakespeare, King Lear , IV-vi:
  • That fellow handles his bow like a crowkeeper
  • To accustom to the hand; to work upon, or take care of, with the hands.
  • * Sir W. Temple:
  • The hardness of the winters forces the breeders to house and handle their colts six months every year
  • To receive and transfer; to have pass through one's hands; hence, to buy and sell
  • a merchant handles a variety of goods, or a large stock
  • To deal with; to make a business of.
  • * Jeremiah, 2:8:
  • They that handle the law knew me not
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=2011 , date=December 16 , author=Denis Campbell , title=Hospital staff 'lack skills to cope with dementia patients' , work=Guardian citation , page= , passage=The findings emerged from questionnaires filled in by 2,211 staff in 145 wards of 55 hospitals in England and Wales and 105 observations of care of dementia patients. Two-thirds of staff said they had not had enough training to provide proper care, 50% said they had not been trained how to communicate properly with such patients and 54% had not been told how to handle challenging or aggressive behaviour.}}
  • To treat; to use, well or ill.
  • * Shakespeare, Henry VI , Part I, I-iv:
  • How wert thou handled being prisoner
  • To manage; to control; to practice skill upon.
  • * Shakespeare, Measure for Measure , V-i:
  • You shall see how I'll handle her
  • To use or manage in writing or speaking; to treat, as a theme, an argument, or an objection.
  • * :
  • We will handle what persons are apt to envy others
  • (soccer) To touch the ball with the hand or arm; to commit handball.
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=2011 , date=February 12 , author=Les Roopanarine , title=Birmingham 1 - 0 Stoke , work=BBC citation , page= , passage=Robert Huth handled a Bentley shot, only for the offence to go unnoticed.}}
    Synonyms
    * feel * finger * touch * deal * manage * treat
    Derived terms
    * to handle without gloves: (colloquial) See under glove * mishandle

    Etymology 3

    Originally Cornish-American, from (etyl) , later hanow (pronounced han'of'' or ''han'o ).

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (slang) A name, nickname or pseudonym.
  • * '>citation
  • * '>citation
  • * '>citation