Haver vs Halver - What's the difference?

haver | halver |


As a verb haver

is .

As a noun halver is

a fisherman who places a net to catch fish in the retreating tide.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

haver

English

Etymology 1

.

Verb

(en verb)
  • (British) To hem and haw
  • * 1988 , , Penguin Books, paperback edition, page 154
  • This didn't seem at all unlikely, but when I none the less havered , he insisted that his 'Egyptian fortune-teller' had confirmed it.
  • (Scotland), Usually haiver . To maunder; to talk foolishly; to chatter; talking nonsense; to babble
  • * 1988 ,
  • And if I haver''', yeah I know I’m gonna be / I’m gonna be the man who’s '''havering to you.
  • * 2004 James Campbell, "Boswell and Mrs. Miller", in The Genius of Language (ed. Wendy Lesser), page 194
  • She havers on about her "faither" and "mirra" and the "wee wean," her child, and "hoo i wiz glaiket but bonny forby."

    Etymology 2

    .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (UK, Scotland, dialect) The cereal oats.
  • Etymology 3

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • One who has, possesses etc.
  • * 1608 ,
  • It is held / That valour is the chiefest virtue, and / Most dignifies the haver : if it be, / The man I speak of cannot in the world / Be singly counterpoised.
    Synonyms
    * holder * possessor ----

    halver

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • a fisherman who places a net to catch fish in the retreating tide
  • (pluralonly) sharing]] in [[half, halves
  • Let's go halvers on the tab tonight.

    Quotations

    sharing * 1816 :like a Scotch schoolboy when he finds anything, "Nae halvers and quarters--hale o' mine ain and 'nane o' my neighbour's." — Sir Walter Scott, The Antiquary, Vol.2, 1816