Halsed vs Halted - What's the difference?

halsed | halted |


As verbs the difference between halsed and halted

is that halsed is (halse) while halted is (halt).

halsed

English

Verb

(head)
  • (halse)

  • halse

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) hals, from (etyl) .

    Alternative forms

    * (l) (Scotland)

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (anatomy, archaic) The neck; the throat.
  • Derived terms
    * (l)

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) halsen, halchen, from (etyl) *.

    Alternative forms

    * (l) * (l) (dialectal) * (l), (l) (Scotland)

    Verb

    (hals)
  • (label) To fall upon the neck of; embrace.
  • *:
  • soo the Kyng took a lytel hackney and but fewe felauship with him vntyl he came vnto sir Tristrams pauelione / and whanne syre Trystram sawe the Kynge / he ranne vnto hym and wold haue holden his styrope / But the kynge lepte from his hors lyghtly / and eyther halsed other in armes

    Etymology 3

    From (etyl) halsen, . More at (l), (l).

    Verb

    (hals)
  • To greet; salute; hail.
  • To beseech; adjure.
  • Etymology 4

    From (etyl) .

    Alternative forms

    * (l)

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • Verb

    (hals)
  • (obsolete) To haul; to hoist.
  • Anagrams

    * * * * * * ----

    halted

    English

    Verb

    (head)
  • (halt)
  • Anagrams

    * *

    halt

    English

    (wikipedia halt)

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) (m), from (etyl) . English usage in the sense of 'make a halt' is from the noun. Cognate with North Frisian (m), Swedish (m).

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (label) To limp; move with a limping gait.
  • (label) To stand in doubt whether to proceed, or what to do; hesitate; be uncertain; linger; delay; mammer.
  • * Bible, 1 Kings xviii. 21
  • How long halt ye between two opinions?
  • (label) To be lame, faulty, or defective, as in connection with ideas, or in measure, or in versification.
  • Etymology 2

    From (etyl) (m), from (etyl) . More at (l).

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (lb) To stop marching.
  • (lb) To stop either temporarily or permanently.
  • *
  • *:And it was while all were passionately intent upon the pleasing and snake-like progress of their uncle that a young girl in furs, ascending the stairs two at a time, peeped perfunctorily into the nursery as she passed the hallway—and halted amazed.
  • (lb) To bring to a stop.
  • (lb) To cause to discontinue.
  • :
  • Noun

    (en noun)
  • A cessation, either temporary or permanent.
  • * Clarendon
  • Without any halt they marched.
  • A minor railway station (usually unstaffed) in the United Kingdom.
  • Etymology 3

    (etyl) healt (verb (healtian)), from (etyl) . Cognate with Danish halt, Swedish halt.

    Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • (archaic) Lame, limping.
  • * 1526 , William Tyndale, trans. Bible , Mark IX:
  • It is better for the to goo halt into lyfe, then with ij. fete to be cast into hell [...].
  • * Bible, Luke xiv. 21
  • Bring in hither the poor, and the maimed, and the halt , and the blind.

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To limp.
  • * 1610 , , act 4 scene 1
  • Do not smile at me that I boast her off,
    For thou shalt find she will outstrip all praise,
    And make it halt behind her.
  • To waver.
  • To falter.
  • Noun

    (en noun)
  • (dated) Lameness; a limp.
  • Anagrams

    * English ergative verbs ----