Hauls vs Halls - What's the difference?

hauls | halls |


As a verb hauls

is (haul).

As a noun halls is

.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

hauls

English

Verb

(head)
  • (haul)
  • Anagrams

    * ----

    haul

    English

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To carry something; to transport something, with a connotation that the item is heavy or otherwise difficult to move.
  • To pull or draw something heavy.
  • * Denham
  • Some dance, some haul the rope.
  • * Alexander Pope
  • Thither they bent, and hauled their ships to land.
  • To transport by drawing, as with horses or oxen.
  • to haul logs to a sawmill
  • * Ulysses S. Grant
  • When I was seven or eight years of age, I began hauling all the wood used in the house and shops.
  • (nautical) To steer a vessel closer to the wind.
  • * Cook
  • I hauled up for it, and found it to be an island.
  • (nautical, of the wind) To shift fore (more towards the bow).
  • (figuratively) To pull.
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=2012 , date=April 21 , author=Jonathan Jurejko , title=Newcastle 3-0 Stoke , work=BBC Sport citation , page= , passage=The 26-year-old has proved a revelation since his £10m move from Freiburg, with his 11 goals in 10 matches hauling Newcastle above Spurs, who went down to Adel Taarabt's goal in Saturday's late kick-off at Loftus Road.}}
  • To pull apart, as oxen sometimes do when yoked.
  • Derived terms

    * haulable * haul down

    Antonyms

    * (to steer closer to the wind) veer * (to shift aft) veer

    Derived terms

    * haulage * hauler * haulier * long-haul * longhauling

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A long drive, especially transporting/hauling heavy cargo.
  • An amount of something that has been taken, especially of fish or illegal loot.
  • The robber's haul was over thirty items.
    The trawler landed a ten-ton haul .
  • A pulling with force; a violent pull.
  • (ropemaking) A bundle of many threads, to be tarred.
  • Collectively, all of the products bought on a shopping trip.
  • A haul video
  • Anagrams

    * ----

    halls

    English

    Noun

    (head)
  • (UK, uncountable) student accommodation
  • * 2004 , anonymous student, quoted in K Woodley, "Let the data sing: representing discourse in poetic form", Oral History volumes 31-32, page 49
  • He was chatting to a couple of girls so I went over and introduced myself, said, "Hello, I er... I’m in the same halls as you." He just looked at me and said, "And?"
  • * 2008 , Anshuman Ahmed Mondal, Young British Muslim Voices , page 15
  • 'I had a massive argument with my parents about moving into halls' and they even tried to bribe me a bit and said, "You know, if you don't go into '''halls''' we'll give you the money that you would have paid in ' halls as a gift."
  • * 2009 , anonymous Disability Advisor, quoted in Supporting people with autism through adulthood , National Audit Office, page 30
  • Once B started University he did really well; the structured environment provided by his university suited him well and he loved it so much that by the end of the first term he decided he did want to live in halls after all.
  • * 2010 , Julius Falconer, Tempt Not the Stars , page 127
  • 'Yes. The first year he was in halls but was glad to leave for digs after that.'

    Anagrams

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