Wail vs Hail - What's the difference?

wail | hail |


In lang=en terms the difference between wail and hail

is that wail is to lament; to bewail; to grieve over while hail is to call out loudly in order to gain the attention of.

In obsolete|lang=en terms the difference between wail and hail

is that wail is (obsolete) to choose; to select while hail is (obsolete) healthy, whole, safe.

As nouns the difference between wail and hail

is that wail is a prolonged cry, usually high-pitched, especially as of grief or anguish while hail is balls or pieces of ice falling as precipitation, often in connection with a thunderstorm.

As verbs the difference between wail and hail

is that wail is to cry out, as in sorrow or anguish or wail can be (obsolete) to choose; to select while hail is (impersonal) said of the weather when hail is falling or hail can be to greet; give salutation to; salute.

As an adjective hail is

(obsolete) healthy, whole, safe.

As an interjection hail is

an exclamation of respectful or reverent salutation, or, occasionally, of familiar greeting.

wail

English

Etymology 1

Probably from (etyl) Etymology in Webster's Dictionary

Noun

(en noun)
  • A prolonged cry, usually high-pitched, especially as of grief or anguish.
  • She let out a loud, doleful wail .
  • Any similar sound as of lamentation; a howl.
  • The wail of snow-dark winter winds.
    A bird's wail in the night.
  • A sound made by emergency vehicle sirens, contrasted with "yelp" which is higher-pitched and faster.
  • Verb

    (en verb)
  • To cry out, as in sorrow or anguish.
  • To weep, lament persistently or bitterly.
  • To make a noise like mourning or crying.
  • The wind wailed and the rain streamed down.
  • To lament; to bewail; to grieve over.
  • to wail one's death
    (Shakespeare)
  • (slang, music) To perform with great liveliness and force.
  • *
  • *
  • *
  • Derived terms
    * wailer * wailingly
    References

    Etymology 2

    Compare Icelandic word for "choice".

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (obsolete) To choose; to select.
  • * Henryson
  • Wailed wine and meats
    (Webster 1913) English terms with homophones

    hail

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) haile, hail, from (etyl) ). Root-cognates outside of Germanic include (etyl) .

    Noun

    (-)
  • Balls or pieces of ice falling as precipitation, often in connection with a thunderstorm.
  • Derived terms
    * hailstone * hail storm / hailstorm * hail shaft / hailshaft

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (impersonal) Said of the weather when hail is falling.
  • They say it's going to hail tomorrow.
  • to send or release hail
  • The cloud would hail down furiously within a few minutes .

    Etymology 2

    The adjective hail is a variant of (from the early 13th century). The transitive verb with the meaning "to salute" is also from the 13th century. The cognate verb heal is already Old English (. Also cognate is whole, from Old English (the spelling with wh- is unetymological, introduced in the 15th century).

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • to greet; give salutation to; salute.
  • To name; to designate; to call.
  • * Milton
  • And such a son as all men hailed me happy.
    He was hailed as a hero.
  • to call out loudly in order to gain the attention of
  • Hail a taxi.
    Derived terms
    * hailer * hail from

    Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • (obsolete) Healthy, whole, safe.
  • Interjection

    (en-intj)
  • An exclamation of respectful or reverent salutation, or, occasionally, of familiar greeting.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Hail , brave friend.
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